tort


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tort

n. French for wrong, a civil wrong, or wrongful act, whether intentional or accidental, from which injury occurs to another. Torts include all negligence cases as well as intentional wrongs which result in harm. Therefore tort law is one of the major areas of law (along with contract, real property and criminal law), and results in more civil litigation than any other category. Some intentional torts may also be crimes such as assault, battery, wrongful death, fraud, conversion (a euphemism for theft), and trespass on property and form the basis for a lawsuit for damages by the injured party. Defamation, including intentionally telling harmful untruths about another, either by print or broadcast (libel) or orally (slander), is a tort and used to be a crime as well. (See: negligence, damages, assault, battery, fraud, wrongful death, conversion, trespass, defamation, libel, slander)

tort

noun breach of legal duty, civil wrong, dereliccion of duty, error, fault, invasion of a legal right, legal wrong, malfeasance, misdeed, misdoing, misfeasance, negligent act, personal wrong, private wrong, transgression, violation of a legal duty, wrong, wrongdoing, wrongful act
Associated concepts: action founded in tort, comparative negligence, continuing tort, contributory negligence, foreeeeable consequences, intentional tort, prima facie tort, proximate cause, standard of care, strict liability in tort, successive torts, tort feasor, tortious act, tortious conduct
See also: delict, delinquency, misconduct

tort

a civil wrong. Tortious liability arises from the breach of a duty fixed by law; this duty is towards persons generally and its breach is redressable by an action for unliquidated damages. It is part of the English law of obligations along with contract and restitution. See also ANIMAL LIABILITY, CONVERSION, DUTY OF CARE, ECONOMIC LOSS, ECONOMIC TORTS, EMPLOYER'S LIABILITY, FAULT, NEGLIGENCE, NUISANCE, OCCUPIER'S LIABILITY, PRODUCT LIABILITY, STRICT LIABILITY, TRESPASS, TROVER.

TORT. An injury; a wrong; (q.v.) hence the expression an executor de son tort, of his own wrong. Co. Lit. 158.
     2. Torts may be committed with force, as trespasses, which may be an injury to the person, such as assault, battery, imprisonment; to the property in possession; or they may be committed without force. Torts of this nature are to the absolute or relative rights of persons, or to personal property in possession or reversion, or to real property, corporeal or encorporeal, in possession or reversion: these injuries may be either by nonfeasance, malfeasance, or misfeasance. 1 Chit. Pl. 133-4. Vide 1 Fonb. Eq. 4; Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.; and the article Injury.

References in periodicals archive ?
Scanning through the section above, it would seem the deniers believe there is insufficient empirical evidence to prove the power of deterrence and that the tort system does not achieve the goals it sets out: punishment and deterrence.
Although the response rate was modest (15%), while most agreed that one should not generalize about deterrence because "[i]ndividual judgments affect us in different ways," 73% agreed that a tort judgment against a company in the same line of commerce would prompt their company "to examine methods of production regarding the affected product [or service] and, if needed, quietly take steps to make sure our products are in compliance with applicable standards.
Another argument raised regarding deterrence involves the concession that while there is a real deterrent effect generated by the tort system, it produces antisocial avoidance behaviors that undercut rather than enhance public safety, innovation, and efficiency.
The argument that the discernible consequence of a tort judgment is inefficient and antisocial behavior requires assumptions of poor management, waste, and bad faith.
Civil justice and tort law are about more than compensation.
Beyond protection of the interests of individuals through judgments, the tort system has served as a force to guide the actions of government.
costs of the tort system with one swoop of his wand, and the results are
than the tort system, because all and only those who are liable are made
them, he should not replicate tort doctrine blindly.
explain that tort requires defendants to pay victims primarily so that
like tort law, but it will better achieve tort law's aims.
What, if anything, would we sacrifice by eliminating tort law in