torture

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torture

see HUMAN RIGHTS.

TORTURE, punishments. A punishment inflicted in some countries on supposed criminals to induce them to confess their crimes, and to reveal their associates.
     2. This absurd and tyrannical practice never was in use in the United States; for no man is bound to accuse himself. An attempt to torture a person accused of crime, in order to extort a confession, is an indictable offence. 2 Tyler, 380. Vide Question.

References in periodicals archive ?
I think the punishment must include imprisonment for at least three months or anyone who is caught abusing or torturing a pet must spend three days in police custody," he said.
Meanwhile, he added, societies pay a heavy price for engaging in torture, damaging innocents and their families but also the institutions that do the torturing.
45) A torturer who does not feel responsible for the victim's pain is more likely to continue torturing, and less likely to question the morality of his actions.
These untoward implications have been held by many to constitute a reductio ad absurdum of hedonistic act utilitarianism rather than a weighty consideration in favor of the practice of punishing the innocent or torturing individuals.
2013 (2003); Chanterelle Sung, Torturing the Ticking Bomb Terrorist: An Analysis of Judicially Sanctioned Torture in the Context of Terrorism, 23 B.
The perpetrators were later known as owners of land who had been torturing the victims as a consequence of long-standing land disputes.
He quickly arrested Allende's supporters, torturing and murdering thousands.
Frustrated by Askew's refusal to become compliant and to name others or recant, her interrogators shift from the intimidating language of torture to literally torturing her on the rack.
But instead of pursuing the rampant rumors about contras raping, torturing, and murdering suspected Sandinistas or sympathizers, he focused on reports of rape, torture, and murder by contra commanders against their own troops.
How was it possible, Maran asks, for a civilized country like France to adopt a deliberate policy of savagely torturing prisoners, even people who were not suspected of revolutionary activities or of having valuable information?