trade

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trade

1) n. a business or occupation for profit, particularly in retail or wholesale sales or requiring special mechanical skill. 2) v. to exchange one thing for another, which includes money for goods, goods for goods, and favors for goods or money. (See: trade fixture, trade secret, trademark)

trade

(Commerce), noun barter, business, business affairs, business intercourse, buying and selling, commercial enterprise, deal, exchange, exchange of commodities, marketing, mercantile business, mercantile relaaions, mercatus, merchandising, merchantry, negotiation, nundination, open market, patronage, purchase, sale, sales, swap, traffic, transaction, truck
Associated concepts: combination in restraint of trade, hazzrdous trade, in the ordinary course of trade or business, reetraint of trade, stock in trade, unfair trade

trade

(Occupation), noun ars, assignment, avocation, berth, business, calling, concern, craft, duty, employment, engagement, function, handicraft, job, line, line of work, livelihood, living, metier, office, position, post, practice, profession, pursuit, situation, specialty, task, vocation

trade

verb bargain, barter, buy, buy and sell, carry on commerce, chaffer, commercari, deal, do business, drive a bargain, exchange, huckster, interchange, mercaturam, merchandise, negotiate, purchase, scorse, sell, shop, traffic, transact
Associated concepts: combination in restraint of trade, trade acceptance, trade in interstate commerce
See also: barter, business, buy, calling, career, commerce, commercial, deal, dealings, devolve, dicker, employment, exchange, handle, industry, interchange, job, labor, livelihood, mercantile, occupation, position, practice, profession, pursuit, reciprocate, sale, vend, work

trade

operations of a commercial character involving the provision to customers of goods or services for reward; an adventure in the nature of a trade connotes a single such operation.

TRADE. In its most extensive signification this word includes all sorts of dealings by way of Bale or exchange. In a more limited sense it signifies the dealings in a particular business, as the India trade; by trade is also understood the business of a particular mechanic, hence boys are said to be put apprentices to learn a trade, as the trade of a carpenter, shoemaker, and the like. Bac. Ab. Master and Servant, D 1. Trade differs from art. (q.v.)
     2. It is the policy of the law to encourage trade, and therefore all contracts which restrain the exercise of a man's talents in trade are detrimental to the commonwealth, and therefore void; though he may bind himself not to exercise a trade in a particular place, for, in this last case, as he may pursue it in another place, the commonwealth has the benefit of it. 8 Mass. 223; 9 Mass. 522. Vide Ware R. 257, 260 Com. Dig. h.t.; Vin. Ab. h.t.

References in classic literature ?
I then took leave of him, and exchanging my merchandise for sandal and aloes wood, camphor, nutmegs, cloves, pepper, and ginger, I embarked upon the same vessel and traded so successfully upon our homeward voyage that I arrived in Balsora with about one hundred thousand sequins.
Hitherto they have traded only in marbles and apples.
The Canadian traders, for a long time, had troublesome competitors in the British merchants of New York, who inveigled the Indian hunters and the coureurs des bois to their posts, and traded with them on more favorable terms.
A man died on a Frenchman - it was the same bark that had traded tobacco with the "We're Heres".
Now I remember comrades - Old playmates on new seas - Whenas we traded orpiment Among the savages.
Kadlu traded the rich, creamy, twisted narwhal horn and musk-ox teeth (these are just as valuable as pearls) to the Southern Inuit, and they, in turn, traded with the whalers and the missionary-posts of Exeter and Cumberland Sounds; and so the chain went on, till a kettle picked up by a ship's cook in the Bhendy Bazaar might end its days over a blubber-lamp somewhere on the cool side of the Arctic Circle.
The field-folk shut in there traded northward and westward, travelled, courted, and married northward and westward, thought northward and westward; those on this side mainly directed their energies and attention to the east and south.