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active

adjective assiduous, at work, busily emmloyed, busily engaged, busy, effective, effectual, efficient, energetic, enterprising, functioning, impiger, in a state of action, in actual process, in operation, in practice, industrious, industrius, navus, operant, performing, sedulous, trenchant, vigorous, working
Associated concepts: active concealment, active negligence, active participant, active tort feasor, active trust, active wrongdoing, passive negligence, passive tort feasor
See also: alert, conscious, effective, expeditious, fervent, industrious, moving, operative, potent, rapid, responsive, sedulous, vigilant, volatile, zealous

ACTIVE. The opposite, of passive. We say active debts, or debts due to us; passive debts are those we owe.

References in periodicals archive ?
Well-accepted plasma transfusion guidelines come from multiple sources, including the College of American Pathologists (CAP) and AABB (formerly American Association of Blood Banks).
Published national obstetric transfusion guidelines are available in SA; our findings suggest the need to promote the guidelines (e.
As a result, the trigger point of blood transfusion may be different in the emergency use of the existing transfusion guidelines, for the same patient facing different doctors or different patients facing the same doctor.
British Committee for Standards in Haematology, Transfusion Guidelines for neonates and older children.
Some transfusion guidelines for arthroplasty suggest that patients should receive a transfusion when the Hb falls below 10g/dL or the haemocrit falls below 30%, the 10/30 rule.
5) There is also a strong correlation between the need for blood transfusion and phlebotomy losses (5,10) and it has been suggested that employing restricted transfusion guidelines as well as minimizing blood sampling might obviate the need for erythropoietin exposure.
More conservative transfusion guidelines could increase the available blood supply with no increase in donations because units saved would be available for other patients, notes Dr.