Treatise

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Treatise

A scholarly legal publication containing all the law relating to a particular area, such as Criminal Law or Land-Use Control.

Lawyers commonly use treatises in order to review the law and update their knowledge of pertinent case decisions and statutes.

See: hornbook
References in periodicals archive ?
The unique legal treatise pricing spreadsheet (Appendix H) provides basic bibliographic and pricing information on over 1,400 titles, including the 2000-2004 supplementation costs for each title (2005 for Matthew Bender and some Aspen titles).
The first presents German translations of six minor treatises by Gregory (335-394); the second contains detailed analysis of the treatises; and the third offers supporting studies on theological and philosophical themes, In illud: Tunc et ipse filis, the debate with Apollinaris, and reception.
With this edition of a sixteenth-century treatise on magnetism, previously known only from contemporary references, Monica Ugaglia fills a long-noted lacuna in the history of science, and presents historians with the raw materials for a better understanding of early modern views of occult qualities, experiment, and natural philosophy.
Jose de Torres's Treatise of 1736: General Rules for Accompanying on the Organ, Harpsichord, and the Harp, by Knowing Only How to Sing the Part, or a Bass in Canto Figurado.
Before launching into the treatises themselves, Mansvelt Beck devotes chapter 2 to surveying the treatises included in early dynastic histories.
The second assumption is that the discourse on the evils of the tongue evolved over time, from medieval pastoral writings to seventeenth-century treatises, and in particular it is often argued that it was progressively "secularized," implying that later treatises on slander no longer found their imagery in the Bible only but also in secular texts.
He characterizes the treatises as justification for the Whig-inspired Glorious Revolution of 1688-89 as well as a statement of sophisticated political theory in their own right.
The Music Treatises of Thomas Ravenscroft: 'Treatise of Practicall Musick' and A Briefe Discourse.
of Melbourne, Australia) present a translation with extensive commentary of De agricultura, one of Philo's (20 BCE-50 CE) many surviving treatises.
Edwards characterized the legal treatise as "[t]he paradigm of 'practical' legal scholarship," and listed several "classic examples" of treatises that answered his concerns.
While it is widely believed that Pacioli based it upon one or more extant bookkeeping treatises (see, for example, Hernandez-Esteve, [1994]), we do not know if this is the case.
The practical treatises have been the mainstay of efforts to come to grips with how earlier musicians went about composing, performing, and teaching music as a performative practice.