trope


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As Trope explains, in the 1980s and 1990s a nostalgia industry emerged that sold Hollywood's past with strategies surprisingly parallel to the museological exhibition practices discussed in part one.
The tropes of politics, history and aesthetics are the unifying metaphors among the three essays and trope as the key word runs through the three essays.
The use of the trope of the falling hair establishes Janie's on-going negotiations between domains of difference.
If this and that trope can "exist in many possible worlds", we can determine what is possible for them (and for classes they are parts of) by following them through the worlds; no counterpart substitutes are required.
Trope chose a chronological layout to guide readers, which provides both strengths and weaknesses.
In addition to this cursory recasting of the biblical Isaac in the form of the trope teacher, Potok also literally inverts the fate of the contemporary personality upon which the figure of Benjamin Walter is based: the German-Jewish philosopher Walter Benjamin (1892-1940), who took his own life in order not to be apprehended by the Nazis.
In the third photograph, we see the addition of the "Zionism equals Nazism" trope to the project of repudiation and exclusion of Jews.
The image of the mulatta in the cottage is presented, and then twice revised in Clotel; the basic trope occurs with the quadroon protagonist, Clotel, for whom the work is named.
Among them is Lela Trope, a 55-year-old Springfield resident.
She lets Carrithers and Hardy lead the collection with their own essay, offered under the trope of Theater: "Rex Absconditus: Justice, Presence, and Legitmacy in Measure for Measure.