trope


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As diverse as the attempts to historicize Hollywood have been, Trope suggests that all of the case studies presented are inextricably linked by one common theme: the tension between art and commerce.
An object (a bundle of tropes) possesses a property by possessing a trope which is part of that property, i.
Brown further complicates the trope in Clotel through a third variant, which, although the least developed, is nonetheless important as it is not only the first appearance of the trope in the novel but also the catalyst for the primary plot.
With her daytime hours relatively free, the result of losing her job as a grocery industry sales representative, Trope was spending a good deal of time following news of the emerging national tea party movement.
Although the tropes display occasional short melismatic passages that may indicate modal rhythms, most of the music, both here and in the conductus, is equivocal in terms of such signs, as Cosart pinpoints characteristics of plainchant, organum purum, and copula within and among various pieces.
I am indebted here to Winter's brilliant reading of Dickinson's poem # 512 as a feminist trope for power and confinement in the nineteenth century.
While the Orientalist trope of despotism reduces the Easterner to a slavish figure unconcerned with his freedom or rights, the Occidentalist trope of conspiracy reduces the Westerner to a witless puppet manipulated by unseen hands (while simultaneously absolving the Occidentalist of any responsibility in his own political failures).
Trope said, "Many companies have not been managed to achieve maximum shareholder value.
In the "Introduction," Greene indicates how these cosmogonic and origin myths coalesce with the Eden trope to fit his taxonomy for periods in American history: "the 1490s-1770s--America as an earthly paradise (discovery, exploration, development); the revolutionary/early national period--America as
In her introduction to this volume, which documents and analyses headhunting practices and shows the persistence of headhunting as a trope, the author discusses the contributions of ethnographers of seven regions: i.
In such an age, she argues, those who wish to make society more equitable can begin by "talking back, by calling a trope a trope, and by insisting on a discourse that must disclose its designs upon us," (146)
One great merit, for me perhaps the greatest merit, of James Paxson's book is its clear demonstration that this definition as formulated is hardly complete or sufficient for understanding the extraordinary trope of personification, the trope above all that "speaks other" (alieniloquium is a common synonym in medieval rhetoric for "allegory").