true


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true

(Authentic), adjective according to the facts, accurate, actual, as represented, authenticated, certain, correct, creditable, dependable, exact, factual, fidelis, fidus, founded on fact, genuine, honest, legitimate, literal, not false, not faulty, not fictitious, original, precise, pure, real, realistic, reliable, right, rightful, sound, trustworthy, unadulterated, unaffected, uncolored, undisguised, undisputed, undistorted, unexaggerated, unfabricated, unfallacious, unfeigned, unfictitious, unimagined, unmistaken, unperjured, unpretended, unspurious, unvarnished, valid, veracious, veridical, verifiable, veritable, verus, well-based, well-grounded
Associated concepts: true bill, true copy, true value, true verdict

true

(Loyal), adjective ardent, assiduous, compliant, complying, conscientious, constant, dedicated, devoted, duteous, dutiful, earnest, faithful, fervent, firm in adherence, firm in allegiance, incorruptible, reliable, resolute, responsible, sincere, stanch, steady, sure, tried, truehearted, trustworthy, trusty, unbetraying, unfailing, unfalse, unperfidious, unswerving, untreacherous, unwavering, zealous
See also: absolute, accurate, actual, authentic, candid, conclusive, convincing, credible, de facto, definite, dependable, devoted, direct, documentary, factual, faithful, genuine, honest, incontestable, incontrovertible, literal, loyal, positive, proper, pure, real, reliable, rightful, serious, solid, sound, staunch, steadfast, sterling, unadulterated, undistorted, unrefutable, unyielding, valid, veridical

BILL, TRUE. A true bill is an indictment approved of by a grand jury. Vide Billa Vera; True Bill.

References in classic literature ?
The long chains of simple and easy reasonings by means of which geometers are accustomed to reach the conclusions of their most difficult demonstrations, had led me to imagine that all things, to the knowledge of which man is competent, are mutually connected in the same way, and that there is nothing so far removed from us as to be beyond our reach, or so hidden that we cannot discover it, provided only we abstain from accepting the false for the true, and always preserve in our thoughts the order necessary for the deduction of one truth from another.
Now, in conclusion, the method which teaches adherence to the true order, and an exact enumeration of all the conditions of the thing .
The conversation began between them by the king according to him one of the highest favors that he had ever done; it was true the king was alone with his subject.
It may be observed, however, that the fanciful notion of pre-existence is combined with a true but partial view of the origin and unity of knowledge, and of the association of ideas.
The germs of two valuable principles of education may also be gathered from the 'words of priests and priestesses:' (1) that true knowledge is a knowledge of causes (compare Aristotle's theory of episteme); and (2) that the process of learning consists not in what is brought to the learner, but in what is drawn out of him.
Anytus is the type of the narrow-minded man of the world, who is indignant at innovation, and equally detests the popular teacher and the true philosopher.
To say that any given person believes some things so firmly that he cannot be made to doubt them is no doubt true.
Nevertheless, it is perhaps true that judgments having a high degree of subjective certainty are more apt to be true than other judgments.
According to this view, any set of propositions other than the whole of truth can be condemned on purely logical grounds, as internally inconsistent; a single proposition, if it is what we should ordinarily call false, contradicts itself irremediably, while if it is what we should ordinarily call true, it has implications which compel us to admit other propositions, which in turn lead to others, and so on, until we find ourselves committed to the whole of truth.
I am persuaded," says he, "had those men lived in the savage country whence their wives came, the savages would have taken more pains to have brought them to be idolaters, and to worship the devil, than any of these men, so far as I can see, have taken with them to teach the knowledge of the true God.
It is on this principle that our Church sends missionaries into Persia, India, and China; and that our clergy, even of the superior sort, willingly engage in the most hazardous voyages, and the most dangerous residence amongst murderers and barbarians, to teach them the knowledge of the true God, and to bring them over to embrace the Christian faith.
I had here the spirit of true Christian zeal for God and religion before me.