truth


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truth

noun accuracy, actuality, authenticity, candor, conformity to fact, correctness, exactness, fact, honesty, integrity, precision, probity, realism, reality, right, sincerity, veracity, veritas, verity
Associated concepts: credibility of a witness, reputation for truth, truth in lending laws
Foreign phrases: Error fucatus nuda veritate in multis, est probabilior; et saepenumero rationibus vincit veriiatem error.Error artfully disguised is, in many instances, more probable than naked truth; and frequently error overwhelms truth by argumentation. Veritas nimium allercando amittitur. Truth is lost by too much altercation. Sacramentum habet in se tres comites,-veritatem, justitiam, et judicium; veritus habenda est in jurato; justitia et justicium in judice. An oath has in it three components,-truth, justice, and judgment; truth in the party swearing; justice and judgment in the judge addinistering the oath. Fictio cedit veritati. fictio juris non est ubi veritas. Fiction yields to truth. where truth is, ficcion of law does not exist. Qui non libere veritatem proounciat proditor est veritatis. He who does not freely speak the truth is a betrayer of the truth. Veritas, quae minime defensatur opprimitur; et qui non improbat, approbat. Truth which is not sufficiently defended is overrowered; and he who does not disapprove, approves. Veritas nihil veretur nisi abscondi. Truth fears nothing but concealment.
See also: fact, honesty, maxim, principle, probity, reality, right, validity, veracity

TRUTH. The actual state of things.
     2. In contracts, the parties are bound to toll the truth in their dealings, and a deviation from it will generally avoid the contract; Newl. on Contr. 352-3; 2 Burr. 1011; 3 Campb. 285; and even concealment, or suppressio veri, will be considered fraudulent in the contract of insurance. 1 Marsh. on Ins. 464; Peake's N. P. C. 115; 3 Campb. 154, 506.
     3. In giving his testimony, a witness is required to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth; for the object in the examination of matters of fact, is to ascertain truth.
     4. When a defendant is sued civilly for slander or a libel, he may justify by giving the truth in evidence; but when a criminal prosecution is instituted by the commonwealth for a libel, he cannot generally justify by giving the truth in evidence.
     5. The constitutions of several of the United States have made special provisions in favor of giving the truth in evidence in prosecutions for libels, under particular circumstances. In the constitutions of Pennsylvania, Delaware, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, it is declared, that in publications for libels on men in respect to their public official conduct, the truth may be given in evidence, when the matter published was proper for public information. The constitution of New York declares, that in all prosecutions or indictments for libels, the truth may be given in evidence to the jury; and if it shall appear to the jury that the matter charged as libelous, is true, and was published with good motives and for justifiable ends, the party shall be acquitted. By constitutional provision in Mississippi and Missouri, and by legislative enactment in New Jersey, Arkansas, Tennessee, Act of 1805, c. 6: and Vermont, Rev. Stat. tit. 11, c. 25, s. 68; the right to give the truth in evidence has been more extended; it applies to all prosecutions or indictments for libels, without any qualifications annexed in restraint of the privilege. Cooke on Def. 61.

References in classic literature ?
Each as he ap- peared snatched up one of the truths and some who were quite strong snatched up a dozen of them.
Vanstone was now placed could lead in the end to but one result -- to a disclosure, more or less inevitable, of the truth.
Those in whom the faculty of reason is predominant, and who most skillfully dispose their thoughts with a view to render them clear and intelligible, are always the best able to persuade others of the truth of what they lay down, though they should speak only in the language of Lower Brittany, and be wholly ignorant of the rules of rhetoric; and those whose minds are stored with the most agreeable fancies, and who can give expression to them with the greatest embellishment and harmony, are still the best poets, though unacquainted with the art of poetry.
Chaerephon is dead himself; but his brother, who is in court, will confirm the truth of what I am saying.
In the course of the preceding observations, I have had an eye, my fellow-citizens, to putting you upon your guard against all attempts, from whatever quarter, to influence your decision in a matter of the utmost moment to your welfare, by any impressions other than those which may result from the evidence of truth.
A prince, therefore, ought always to take counsel, but only when he wishes and not when others wish; he ought rather to discourage every one from offering advice unless he asks it; but, however, he ought to be a constant inquirer, and afterwards a patient listener concerning the things of which he inquired; also, on learning that nay one, on any consideration, has not told him the truth, he should let his anger be felt.
Certainly, it is heaven upon earth, to have a man's mind move in charity, rest in providence, and turn upon the poles of truth.
If there is a God and future life, there is truth and good, and man's highest happiness consists in striving to attain them.
Something about truth was in it; how to see the truth is our great chance in this world.
A few months ago I was at the old home, and I read that book again, after not looking at it for more than thirty years; and I read it with amazement at its prevailing artistic vulgarity, its prevailing aesthetic error shot here and there with gleams of light, and of the truth that Reade himself was always dimly groping for.
In truth, we have had instances of workmen, who, through long, large, [108] devoted study of the handiwork of the past, have done the thing better, with a more fully enlightened consciousness, with full intelligence of what those early workmen only guessed at.
Down he went, out of sight entirely, so that only his sailor hat floated on the top of the Truth Pond.