Tumbrel

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TUMBREL, punishment. A species of cart; according to Lord Coke, a dung-cart.
     2. This instrument, like the pillory, was used as a means of exposure; and according to some authorities, it seems to have been synonymous with the trebucket or ducking stool. 1 Chit. Cr. Law, 797; 3 Inst. 219; 12 Serg. & Rawle, 220. Vide Com. Dig. h.t.; Burn's Just. Pillory and Tumbrel.

References in periodicals archive ?
And in this train of go-carts, tumbrels, memory, and death, "as if the sky was being pushed in on itself," "as if the armies were strung from the floating clouds," an uprooted civilization is on the hoof.
Here come the tumbrels, inching their way slowly through the rotting cabbages and vulgar ribaldry of Republican isolationists.
Not even essential safety upgrading of thousands of miles of ancient track can disguise the fact that so many of the carriages riding upon those glistening new rails are dowdy, litter-strewn tumbrels more suited to carrying farm stock than long- suffering passengers now paying some of the highest fares per mile anywhere in the world.
There is evidence of people taken on the tumbrels to Tyburn with a Minister saying you have done dreadful deeds and you are bound for hell, why not Praise the Lord.
Can you hear the sound of tumbrels rolling, the guillotine being sharpened, the mob baying for royal blood?
The turretted Conciergerie was the city prison, and thousands passed through waiting for the tumbrels to take them to Madame Guillotine.
The weaknesses of the deposed family recur in its heirs, and people remember why they sent for the tumbrels in the first place.
Nor are we likely to see the aristos of tobacco in the tumbrels.
Katowice was the beginning of the end for two icons of English football, where Bobby Moore's blunders in the 2-0 defeat in 1973 starting the tumbrels that carried Sir Alf Ramsey away nine months later.
The turreted Conciergerie was the city prison, and thousands passed through here waiting for the tumbrels to take them to Madame Guillotine.
Nor did the tumbrels roll when the psychiatric profession went on to discover (and make a bundle from) two entirely new nation-threatening epidemics for which no empirical proof exists: chronic depression (based on the readily observable fact that a whole lot of people, including people with serious or potentially fatal diseases, don't feel so hot about their lives) and suppressed memory.