tutelar


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
See: guardian
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Nao houve relato da necessidade de internacao nesses casos, embora se acredite que internacoes possam ter ocorrido sem que tenham sido registradas no prontuario do Conselho Tutelar.
e colocar na boca e chupar e esclarece ( ) que tentou encaminhar o caso-o caso ao conselho tutelar e que la o menor foi submetido ao exame medico (.
not only The Anathemata, but best part of all his various later pieces, such as "The Wall," "The Tribune's Visitation," "The Fatigue," and even in roundabout ways "The Dream of Private Clitus" and "The Tutelar of the Place," derived.
The first half of the poem ends with Crixus offering a prayer to the Great Mother that celebrates local cultures and asks her to protect them "in the days of the central economies" (SL 63), a prayer Jones published as "The Tutelar of the Place.
In Crixus' hymn to the Great Mother, published as "The Tutelar of the Place," Jones presents an alternative to imperialism and Spengler's "male thought world," drawing largely from "the Jackson Knight thing:" Knight's study of labyrinths, The Cumaean Gates.
The Sleeping Lord, who is the land he protects, complements the Great Mother, the Tutelar of the Place, and together they form the male and female principles of culture that counter imperialism's perversion of those principles.
In what follows, in part II of this article, I will set the works of Tracy, Pickstock, and Lynch in conversation with Jones and with one another, in order to bring the fruits of this conversation to bear (in part III) on my reading of three poems, "The Wall," "The Tribune's Visitation," and "The Tutelar of the Place," from Jones's last collection, The Sleeping Lord and Other Fragments.
The univocal order that has haunted the earlier works is distilled into the figure of the Tribune in "The Tribune's Visitation," for whom "analogies are wearisome," (68) while the "analogical imagination" is embodied by the "The Tutelar of the Place.
The Tutelar magnifies "with made, mutable and beggarly elements the unmade immutable begettings" and is thus linked to the Virgin whose soul "doth magnify the Lord.
David Jones, "The Tutelar of the Place," The Sleeping Lord and Other Fragments (London: Faber and Faber, 1974), 54.
They are scarce or intermittent tutelars of eventual calm that have fitfully intermingled themselves with human tragedy.
First thing for Poets was to get in touch with their tutelars for their sheltering care.