unadaptable


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Party rural affairs spokesperson, Mick Bates AM, said: "Our vision for Welsh farming is based on a new attitude, already signalled by the Assembly's Partnership Government - a "can-do" culture - to counteract the risk-averse, unadaptable attitude dominant in farming for so long.
It is true that some unadaptable Labour and Conservative councillors have complained about the new arrangements.
Conservatives John Simon in The National Review and Stanley Kauffman in The New Republic both saw Potter as having doomed her project to inevitable failure by taking on the hopeless task of adapting a novel that is essentially unadaptable, whereas feminists Jane Marcus in The Women's Review of Books and Robin Morgan in Ms.
Nick Carraway, the narrator and onlooker whose voice is the great success of the book, says, "I see now that this has been a story of the West, after all--Tom and Gatsby, Daisy and Jordan and I, were all Westerners, and perhaps we possessed some deficiency in common which made us subtly unadaptable to Eastern life.
Globalisation has been bad for Africa, and in many parts of the world for employment (see below the section on unemployment), for those without assets or with rigidly fixed and unadaptable skills.
The script, by Brian Helgeland and director Curtis Hanson, does a remarkable job of melding Ellroy's themes and characters - from a seemingly unadaptable novel - into a cohesive, fast-paced whole, adding tart, memorable dialogue along the way.
In his report of 1937, Ocfemia mentioned that farmers suspected the following causes: (1) presence of hard pan close to the surface of the soil, (2) poor drainage, (3) unadaptable site for coconut, (4) poor soil, (5) root parasite, and (6) individual vitality of trees.
Premier Vladmir Meciar of Slovakia is reported to have called his nation's Gypsies "socially unadaptable and mentally backward.