unavowed


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From this standpoint, even 'world literature' might boil down to 'the unavowed imperialism of English,' insofar as English becomes the dominant lingua franca through which world literature is mediated" (ALG7).
The two lyrics of "Error Pursued" insist, first, that "Guilt unavowed is guilt in its extreme"; solipsism is not merely dangerous because we lose the ability to measure ourselves in relation to the extra-mental world, but because one cannot morally measure oneself in relation to "the creditor you owe" (19).
The unavowed reason is that Germany and France are trying to negotiate a package' of appointments, including all the commissioners, in order to keep the choice portfolios (competition, single market) for themselves.
At stake, according to Hyde, is not simply language and literature, but a form of "racial melancholia," an inability "to get over the unavowed, intertwined losses" produced by Anglicization: a denial of the ambition to be English coupled with a repression of a Gaelic culture that is "reviled as worthless and yet revered.
Dodd from Cambridge in 1949, reprinted as "A Letter Concerning Unavowed Motives in Ecumenical Discussions".
16) Whereas the Libro del agrado draws Caraccioli's text into the confessional to reveal the hollowness of its inside, its unavowed sequel returns it to the toilette and revels in its most superficial feature.
it is the category of 'the real' (and not its contingent contents) which is then signified; in other words, the very absence of the signified, to the advantage of the referent alone, becomes the very signifier of realism: the reality effect is produced, the basis of that unavowed verisimilitude which forms the aesthetic of all the standard works of modernity.
The unavowed motivation for the interpretation--indeed, the analytical passion--becomes entangled in a conflation of origin, cause, and intention.
This experiment in the language of Bretonian Surrealism, one which he would never repeat, is therefore more than just a poetic dead end: it is an unavowed subversion of the very possibility of continuing to write 'like that'.
Some principle, however unavowed and inarticulate and subconscious, has regulated the infusion.
My hypothesis is the opposite, that theology goes all the way down, that there are always lingering or unavowed theological presuppositions in what we say or do, and hence, as Heidegger said a long time ago, it is not a question of getting free of our presuppositions but rather of entering into them all the more primordially.
Her dreamy passion had indeed remained completely unavowed.