uncharitableness


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The testimony of his eight, handpicked witnesses proved to him that if children could be thoroughly imbued with this type of education, "ninety-nine in every hundred of them can be rescued from uncharitableness, from falsehood, from intemperance, from cupidity, licentiousness, violence, and fraud" whether the source of these influences was their own nature or society (1848, 113).
Boyle provides two primary bases for dismissing these alternatives: their uncharitableness and failure to accommodate all of Descartes' texts.
Their hearts, while yet tender with childhood, are necessarily hardened by this conduct, and their subsequent lives perhaps bear enduring testimony to this legalized uncharitableness," warned abolitionist Charles Sumner.
there were circumstances in the narrative of some of the three cases that raised misgivings in our minds, for which uncharitableness we ask pardon of God and of Dr McDowell of Danville'.
He blamed "malice, bigotry and uncharitableness [sic]" for the gossip that Fitzsimmons "improperly and dishonestly" gave penitentiary property to the orphanage.
We confide in one statesman and oppose another, and often from unfounded antipathies as from reason; religion is tainted with uncharitableness and hostilities without examination; usages are contemned, tastes ridiculed and we decide wrong, from the practice of submitting to a preconceived and an unfounded prejudice, the most active and the most pernicious of all the hostile agents of the human mind.