uninfluential


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The demands of employees, shareholders, and consumers and clients are some of the influences considered to have had the least impact, and perceived economic benefits and stock exchange requirements are viewed as similarly uninfluential.
And while he got some indifferent and worse performers among his results, he also obtained the best that anyone obtained from Coronach (Niccolo Dell'Arca), Blenheim (Donatello), Blue Peter (Botticelli), Dante (Toulouse Lautrec) and the distinctly uninfluential Mid-day Sun (De Nittis).
For a briefer and more recent account of Newman's place in the history of philosophy, see Fergus Kerr, "'In an Isolated and, Philosophically Uninfluential Way': Newman and Oxford Philosophy.
Those invites come at the discretion of the sponsors and the Tour are not exactly uninfluential when it comes to doling them out.
Specific religious and political traditions, as well as the official acceptance of violence in the resolution of conflict by governments--as argued by authors who postulate a "brutalization theory" (Archer and Gartner, 1984)--will hardly be uninfluential on the unfolding of punishment (Melossi, 2001; Savelsberg, 2002).
What this means is probably that the effects are real, but they are small because each type of expected outcome has a substantial effect on attitude toward growth only for some managers, whereas it is relatively uninfluential for others.
2000), I'd like to comment that this publication is a "pie in the sky" unrealistic, intellectual, academic, interesting, but completely uninfluential magazine.
sympathizers to have been absolutely uninfluential during the New Deal
The second reason why empirical studies are so sparse and uninfluential is the problem of commitment to a particular value or ideology.
The first was this: "Be inadequate and uninfluential.
It is also likely to remain uninfluential in feminist legal circles for a different reason, namely that the writing is so full of obscure, erudite allusions that it makes Judith Butler's books read like detective novels.
The thinkers described by Alexander are an incoherent grab-bag of minor and uninfluential thinkers of varying quality who do not constitute a coherent philosophical or legal tradition, but rather a desire to justify governmental incursions on liberty and private property rights.