unmethodical


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She then alludes to her irregular education, recalling Mary Wollstonecraft's chief complaint about the deficits of female learning: "my reading through the whole of my life," Baillie admits, "has been of a loose, scattered, unmethodical kind, with no determined direction, and I have not been blessed by nature with the advantages of a retentive or accurate memory," and she concludes the paragraph with a promise to make amends for any omissions in a second edition, if such an edition occurs (112).
In the dedicatory epistle to Miscellania or a Treatise Contayning Two Hundred Controuersiall Animaduersions (1640; STC 576) he emphasizes the unmethodical approach of the miscellany:
They looked unmethodical in mustering only two shots during their two-minute advantage.
Arnold's careful sifting of these three classes and their representative figures (the most methodical aspect of a thoroughly unmethodical book) is largely an inventory of their shortcomings, and those positive remarks that do appear tend to be cut short by the kind of barbed generalization one comes to expect in his prose, such as when he follows a discussion of the admirable "manners and dignity" of the aristocracy with the observation that their serenity "appears to come from their never having had any ideas to trouble them" (83-84).
Desultorily means "going constantly from one subject to another, disconnected, unmethodical.