unpeopled


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In contrast, unpeopled or pristine nature is idealized.
2) One notable exception is a pair of images: Anne Langton's unpicturesque ink drawing of the Otanabee River's unpeopled but stump laden river bank in 1837 is, without aesthetic analysis, reproduced above her postsettlement picturesque watercolour, sketched from a similar perspective fifteen years later (71).
The 'stillness' of an unpeopled house, the specific absence a metaphor for the larger absence of death, envelops every other detail in the scene and leads the reader towards the surprising image of the man standing still in a rowboat 'as if fishing for perch'.
John Lomax in his 1910 Cowboy Songs and Other Frontier Ballads, for example, writes, "Out in the wild, far-away places of the big and still unpeopled west .
zeal I had To explore the world, and search the ways of life, To this the short remaining watch, that yet Our senses have to wake, refuse not proof Of the unpeopled world, following the track Of Phoebus.
But the 5-0 decision by the Federal Communications Commission to allow wireless broadband on part of the television spectrum may eventually make a difference in the amount of Internet available in our less-settled areas, in those woody, unpeopled areas up north, or around Peterborough and Keene.
Louisiana might be big, but it was wild and unpeopled.
In many of the photographs the artist has placed the spindly framework of a ceramic chair seemingly made of branches similar to those one would find scattered along the track, a symbol of human presence in this unpeopled bushscape, deceptively untouched except for the insertion of the track itself.
His landscapes are unpeopled, but he did respond to architecture as well as to the natural scenery.
is cheap, unpeopled, essential for restoring wilderness, and for
We had to change at Stevenage, and there wasn't anyone in my carriage with whom I could have a bet that no-one would get off or come on to the train at Arlesey - an Adlestrop of a halt serving a town that appears to be unpeopled, with nil birthrate and crime rate, else I would have heard of it.
Both films start from the smallest corner of "the local," a rural Australian town whose remoteness and smallness is made apparent by panning, high-angle extreme long shots of a car moving through unpeopled fields.