unsatisfactoriness


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The basis of suffering--or dukkha--is attributed to persistent experiences of unsatisfactoriness that is borne from our intrinsic need to cling to and crave objects and states.
deeper, less definable unsatisfactoriness in the very foundations of
Oakeshott says, "But, since it is his situation, this unsatisfactoriness is recognized not merely as a defect but as a defect unacceptable to himself, and since he is an agent, he recognizes it as inviting a response of which he is to be the author" (1975, 38).
When facing the sort of situations that raise the very real possibility of harm, Dewey asserts there are only two courses of action open: A person can "make a change in himself either by running away from trouble or by steeling himself to Stoic endurance; or he can set to work to do something so as to change the conditions of which unsatisfactoriness is a quality.
Stage three is called the fearless mind, referring to those who have realized the unsatisfactoriness of this earthly life.
Human existence, therefore, conceived comprehensively, is characterized by a ubiquitous sense of unsatisfactoriness and dis-ease.
While in this work Austin-Broos does not engage anthropologically with the other side of the negotiation -- that is, with the `non Aboriginal consociates' who refuse `spaces of disclosure' -- importantly, the unsatisfactoriness of such spaces as the land courts is identified.
As late as 1872, the registrar general of Ontario remarked that "the death returns exhibit their bad pre-eminence in unsatisfactoriness.
Coming to terms with these natural truths allows us to move more freely in everyday situations of unsatisfactoriness without becoming frustrated with them--in the thought of some future goal that is consequently being missed.