unwilling to care

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They have proved they are unable to unwilling to care for anything.
An average of 10 pooches a day are being put down in pounds around the country as pet owners become unable or unwilling to care for their pets.
Known as Angel Cradles, the safe havens provide a means for parents who are unable or unwilling to care for their newborns to safely and anonymously leave their baby in a hospital bassinet, accessed via a secure, electronically monitored door discreetly located external to the Emergency Departments.
Those with schizophrenia were often seen as unpredictable, potentially self-injurious and unwilling to care for their children.
In an era in which young people increasingly are having children whom they are unable or unwilling to care for, grandparents have had to step in to save the future of this fragile group of children.
However, this trend may lead to the eventual need to establish substantially more out of home placements as parents become unable or family members become unwilling to care for the individual.
Officers may view the neighborhood as unable or unwilling to care for itself.
She told of her astonishment at how an angelic-looking schoolgirl turned into a heroin addict unwilling to care for her own children.
A Newcastle City Council spokeswoman said: "In this case, social workers made extensive contact with several relatives who were all unwilling to care for the children or give contact details of other family members.
If the agency finds that the mother is either unable or unwilling to care for her child, it takes the child into protective custody, and usually tries to find a foster home--very often with a relative.
Medical illnesses such as stroke, a heart attack, cancer, Parkinson's disease, and hormonal disorders can cause depressive illness, making the sick person apathetic and unwilling to care for his or her physical needs, thus prolonging the recovery period.
The reformers rejected the emerging society of voluntary contract, where positive obligations were self-imposed, in favor of a model of community consisting of unchosen positive obligations to care for citizens who are unable or unwilling to care for themselves.