utter

(redirected from utterable)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms.

Utter

To publish or offer; to send into circulation.

The term utter is frequently used in reference to Commercial Paper. To utter and publish an instrument is to declare, either directly or indirectly through words or action, that it is good. It constitutes a crime, for example, to utter a forged check.

utter

v. 1) to issue a forged document. 2) to speak. (See: forgery)

utter

verb air, announce, articulate, assert, aver, breathe, broach, circulate, come out with, communicate, declaim, declare, deliver, dicere, disclose, emit, enunciate, express, give expression to, give forth, impart, issue, make known, mouth, proclaim, propound, publicize, publish, recite, reveal, sound, speak, spread, state, talk, tell, vent, voice
See also: absolute, arrant, avow, comment, communicate, complete, confess, converse, declare, definite, disclose, disseminate, enunciate, express, flagrant, gross, mention, observe, outright, phrase, proclaim, profess, pronounce, publish, pure, recite, relate, remark, reveal, speak, stark, tell, thorough, total, unconditional, unequivocal, unlimited, unmitigated, unqualified

TO UTTER, crim. law. To offer, to publish.
     2. To utter and publish a counterfeit note is to assert and declare, directly or indirectly, by words or actions, that the note offered is good. It is not necessary that it should be passed in order to complete the offence of uttering. 2. Binn. R. 338, 9. It seems that reading out a document, although the party refuses to show it, is a sufficient uttering. Jebb's Ir. Cr. Cas. 282. Vide East, P. C. 179; Leach, 251; 2 Stark. Ev. 378 1 Moody, C. C. 166; 2 East, P. C. 974 Russ. & Ry. 113; 1 Phil. Ev. Index, h.t.; Roscoe's Cr. Ev. 301. The merely showing a false instrument with intent to gain a credit when there was no intention or attempt made to pass it, it seems would not amount to an uttering. Russ. & Ry. 200. Vide Ringing the charge.

References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, to be utterable in the 1790s, prophecy had to be presented as ventriloquism, quotation, and joint authorship; this destabilization of authorial status Coleridge encodes within the poem itself.
And thus is the sphere of reason both extended (to virtually all spaces of human experience) and limited (now, only certain things count as utterable "within the true").
Chafe claims that in the derivation (moving from meaning to sound), there must be a conversion of semantic units into utterable phonetic elements -- what he calls a "symbolization of meaning", with semantics as the starting point in this process.