ability

(redirected from verbal ability)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to verbal ability: Verbal reasoning

ability

noun ableness, adaptability, adeptness, aptitude, aptness, capability, capacity, competence, competency, enablement, facultas, faculty, fitness, ingenium, mastership, mastery, potentiality, potestas, proficiency, prowess, skill, versatility
Associated concepts: ability to contract, ability to earn, abillty to pay, ability to perform, ability to provide, ability to purchase, ability to support, capacity, financial ability, readiness, testamentary ability
See also: aptitude, caliber, capacity, efficiency, facility, fitness, flair, force, gift, grade, performance, potential, proclivity, propensity, qualification, quality, science, skill, specialty, strength, technique
References in periodicals archive ?
1997), and verbal ability (Zachary 1986; Grober, Sliwinsk, and Korey 1991; Robbins et al.
The demographic characteristics as well as means for the verbal ability and real and pseudoword reading measures are listed in Table D.
In the behaviour dimension, weighted likelihood estimates were used to estimate a student's verbal ability (OECD, 2001b).
We know through research that 93% of the impression you leave on somebody has little to do with content and everything to do with body language and verbal ability -- how you talk, sound, look and what you're wearing," Gallo reveals.
At age 11, participants had taken tests of general intelligence and maths and verbal ability.
The greatest predictor of future academic success is current academic success and the second strongest predictor is verbal ability (Lohman, 2006b).
Participants played a word game that assessed their verbal ability and were awarded points for each task.
Indeed, DHA consumption has been positively linked to improved verbal ability, cognition and visual performance.
The women underwent blood sampling for DHEAS and a battery of tests of cognitive function that measured verbal ability, spatial and working memory, attention and concentration, and speed and accuracy.
With respect to child characteristics, the children who made the largest gains and achieved a maximum emotion recognition score at year-end (participants 4, 5, 6, and 8) appeared to differ from children who achieved smaller gains in terms of their having higher verbal ability scores, and also higher baseline emotion recognition scores.
Kids living in the most disadvantaged communities displayed marked declines in age-appropriate verbal ability over a 7-year span, even after moving to better areas, reports a team led by Harvard University sociologist Robert J.
Head of the research Robert Sampson said, "For children, living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods appeared to have a detrimental effect on verbal ability.