border

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border

noun ambit, borderland, boundary, bounds, brim, brink, circumference, circumjacence, confine, edge, edging, end, enframement, extremity, flange, frame, fringe, frontier, hem, ledge, limit, line of demarcation, marge, margin, outline, outpost, outside, outskirts, pale, perimeter, periphery, purlieus, rim, selvedge, side, skirt, termination, verge
Associated concepts: border search

border

(Approach), verb abut upon, adjoin, align connergently, approximate, be in the vicinity of, be near, close on, come close, come to a point, concentrate, converge, draw near, encroach, gravitate toward, join, juxtapose, lie near, meet, move toward, near, neighbor, place in juxtaposition, place near, place parallel, proximate, put along side, skim, skirt, unite, verge, verge upon

border

(Bound), verb abut upon, adiacere, adjoin, appose, attach, attingere, be adjacent to, be circumjacent to, be conterminous, be contiguous, be in conjunction with, be in contact with, be juxtaposed, butt, cincture, circumpose, circumvalate, circumvent, close in, confine, conjoin, connect, contain, corral, cut off, define, delimit, delimitate, demarcate, edge, embrace, encase, enchase, enclose, enclose within bounds, encompass, ensphere, envelop, environ, extend to, flank, frame, gird, hem in, join, juxtapose, juxtaposit, lean against, lie contiguous to, lie next to, limit, mark off, meet end to end, meet with, outline, place limitations, proscribe, restrain, restrict, shut in, specify limits, stake out, surround
See also: abutment, ambit, boundary, circumscribe, connection, contact, contain, define, demarcate, enclose, enclosure, encompass, end, extremity, frontier, hedge, juxtapose, limit, margin, mete, outline, periphery, tenant, termination
References in periodicals archive ?
Anatomic sites such as upper and lower lips, buccal mucosa, vermilion border, retromolar area and gingiva were clinically examined for Fordyce's granules.
The advantages of the bone-anchored suture technique over the more traditional methods include (1) relatively small incisions that can be camouflaged in the nasolabial crease and vermilion border, (2) minimal dissection, (3) burial of the anchor under the bone surface, (4) the simplicity of the procedure with suture, (5) ease of suture removal, and (6) the overall mechanical strength of the system, which allows for suspension of a large tissue mass.
The rash is classically described as tiny, dry, erythematous papulopustules in a pattern around the mouth, nasolabial folds, and chin, with sparing of the vermilion border.