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Whereupon he presently began to sing verses to the praise of God, which he had never heard, the purport whereof was thus:--
For verses, though never so well composed, cannot be literally (that is word for word) translated out of one language into another without losing much of their beauty and loftiness.
After my day's work at the case I wore the evening away in my boyish literary attempts, forcing my poor invention in that unnatural kind, and rubbing and polishing at my wretched verses till they did sometimes take on an effect, which, if it was not like Pope's, was like none of mine.
Moliere says so, and Moliere is a judge of such things; he declares he has himself made a hundred thousand verses.
thank you, La Fontaine; you have just given me the two concluding verses of my paper.
The significance of 'The Shepherd's Calendar' lies partly in its genuine feeling for external Nature, which contrasts strongly with the hollow conventional phrases of the poetry of the previous decade, and especially in the vigor, the originality, and, in some of the eclogues, the beauty, of the language and of the varied verse.
The dedication is to Queen Elizabeth, to whom, indeed, as its heroine, the poem pays perhaps the most splendid compliment ever offered to any human being in verse.
The author of that book, too," said the curate, "is a great friend of mine, and his verses from his own mouth are the admiration of all who hear them, for such is the sweetness of his voice that he enchants when he chants them: it gives rather too much of its eclogues, but what is good was never yet plentiful: let it be kept with those that have been set apart.
That Cervantes has been for many years a great friend of mine, and to my knowledge he has had more experience in reverses than in verses.
Two thousand verses is a great many -- very, very great many.
and Count Rostov, glancing angrily at the author who went on reading his verses, bowed to Bagration.
The first of the following verses is Hesiod's and the next Homer's: but sometimes Hesiod puts his question in two lines.