Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome

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Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome

the current medical description of what used to include vibration induced white finger, a condition often suffered by workers using vibrating power tools and often litigated. In such cases use is made of the Taylor Pelmear Scale and the Stockholm Scale as ways of indicating the severity of the disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Employees started suffering from all kinds of psychological syndromes, from nomophobia (fear of being without a phone) to phantom vibration syndrome (where you think you feel your phone vibrating even though your phone isn't there) to screen insomnia to smartphone addiction.
com/science/article/pii/S0747563212000799) Phantom vibration syndrome  is a relatively new but completely legitimate psychological process where individuals constantly believe their phones are vibrating.
Company officers had also admitted charges that four employees had been diagnosed with Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS) as a result of regular use of percussive or vibrating tools, and these had not been reported to the relevant enforcing authority.
The ongoing research of the ATRG has focussed on HTVs, which are known to cause various musculoskeletal, neurological, and vascular disorders such as hand-arm vibration syndrome and carpal tunnel syndrome.
Zulquernain Mallick discussed about Hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) is very common among workers operating power tools and performing similar work for extended period of time.
According to a research, nine out of 10 people have exhibited phantom vibration syndrome, in which people mistaken an itch or a muscle spasm as phone vibration.
2009) Process management and tool selection to minimize risk of hand-arm vibration syndrome, San Diego, CA," in Presentation to the National Defense Industries Association (NDIA) Systems Engineering Conference, San Diego, CA, USA, October 26-29, 2009.
Damage caused by vibrating power tools - identify measures to eliminate or reduce the risk of hand-arm vibration syndrome.
It comes as a 44-yearold Gateshead man won compensation after developing Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS) because of his work.
Since repeated forceful gripping and coupling forces at the interface of the hand-arm system and the vibrating tool can be at risk of developing circulatory, neurological, or musculoskeletal disorders (Griffin and Bovenzi, 2002; NIOSH, 1997) which have been collectively grouped as hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) (Gemne and Taylor, 1983), a bicycle rider can be considered vulnerable to develop vibration related overuse injuries and/or performance diminishing consequences.
A vibration syndrome is associated with tingling and numbness of the hands as well as vasoconstriction of blood vessels, causing the fingers to appear white.
The condition is also known as Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS) as the condition can easily affect the rest of the arm.