vice

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Vice

A fault, flaw, defect, or imperfection. Immoral conduct, practice, or habit.

In Civil Law, redhibitory vices are defects or flaws in the subject matter of a sale that entitle the buyer to return the item and recover the purchase price.A vice crime is any type of immoral and illegal activity, such as prostitution, the sale of Drugs and Narcotics, and gambling.

vice

noun atrocity, bad habit, blemish, corruption, defect, deficiency, degeneracy, delinquency, depravity, dereliction, dissipation, dissoluteness, evil, excess, failing, failure, fault, flaw, foible, fraility, immoral habit, immorality, imperfection, impurity, inadequacy, indecency, indulgence, infamy, infirmity, iniquity, lack, lewdness, libertinism, licentiousness, looseness, mar, maleficence, malignance, misconduct, misdeed, obliquity, outrage, perversion, profligacy, shortcoming, sin, sinfulness, transgression, turpitude, unchastity, vileness, wantonness, weak point, weakness, wickedness, wrong, wrongdoing
See also: bad repute, flaw, foible, guilt, mens rea, mischief, misdoing, sodomy, wrong

VICE. A term used in the civil law and in Louisiana, by which is meant a defect in a thing; an imperfection. For example, epilepsy in a slave, roaring and crib-biting in a horse, are vices. Redhibitory vices are those for which the seller will be compelled to annul a sale, and take back the thing sold. Poth. Vente, 203; Civ. Code of Lo. art. 2498 to 2507; 1 Duv. n. 396.

References in classic literature ?
Murder, burglary, intemperance, or the minor vices you could have borne; but deceit you cannot abide.
As for yourself," continued the king, "who have spent the greatest part of your life in travelling, I am well disposed to hope you may hitherto have escaped many vices of your country.
I quite sympathize with the rage of the English democracy against what they call the vices of the upper orders.
In his account of the mission, where his veracity is most to be suspected, he neither exaggerates overmuch the merits of the Jesuits, if we consider the partial regard paid by the Portuguese to their countrymen, by the Jesuits to their society, and by the Papists to their church, nor aggravates the vices of the Abyssins; but if the reader will not be satisfied with a Popish account of a Popish mission, he may have recourse to the history of the church of Abyssinia, written by Dr.
A wiser and more useful philosophy, however, directs us to consider man according to the nature in which he was formed; subject to infirmities, which no wisdom can remedy; to weaknesses, which no institution can strengthen; to vices, which no legislation can correct.
If momentary rays of glory break forth from the gloom, while they dazzle us with a transient and fleeting brilliancy, they at the same time admonish us to lament that the vices of government should pervert the direction and tarnish the lustre of those bright talents and exalted endowments for which the favored soils that produced them have been so justly celebrated.
For the hereditary prince has less cause and less necessity to offend; hence it happens that he will be more loved; and unless extraordinary vices cause him to be hated, it is reasonable to expect that his subjects will be naturally well disposed towards him; and in the antiquity and duration of his rule the memories and motives that make for change are lost, for one change always leaves the toothing for another.
The vices and diseases introduced among these unhappy people annually swell the ordinary mortality of the islands, while, from the same cause, the originally small number of births is proportionally decreased.
For the control of the hero the two definitely opposing groups of Virtues and Vices contend; the commonest type of Morality presents in brief glimpses the entire story of the hero's life, that is of the life of every man.
I am, therefore, in a measure constrained to follow that road, and by it I must travel in spite of all the world, and it will be labour in vain for you to urge me to resist what heaven wills, fate ordains, reason requires, and, above all, my own inclination favours; for knowing as I do the countless toils that are the accompaniments of knight-errantry, I know, too, the infinite blessings that are attained by it; I know that the path of virtue is very narrow, and the road of vice broad and spacious; I know their ends and goals are different, for the broad and easy road of vice ends in death, and the narrow and toilsome one of virtue in life, and not transitory life, but in that which has no end; I know, as our great Castilian poet says, that-
There remains, then, the character between these two extremes,- -that of a man who is not eminently good and just,-yet whose misfortune is brought about not by vice or depravity, but by some error or frailty.
When from dark error's subjugation My words of passionate exhortation Had wrenched thy fainting spirit free; And writhing prone in thine affliction Thou didst recall with malediction The vice that had encompassed thee: And when thy slumbering conscience, fretting By recollection's torturing flame, Thou didst reveal the hideous setting Of thy life's current ere I came: When suddenly I saw thee sicken, And weeping, hide thine anguished face, Revolted, maddened, horror-stricken, At memories of foul disgrace.