virtue

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Related to virtues: Theological virtues
References in classic literature ?
On more accounts than one, a pity it is that the whale does not possess this prehensile virtue in his tail; for I have heard of yet another elephant, that when wounded in the fight, curved round his trunk and extracted the dart.
His eyes want all that spirit, that fire, which at once announce virtue and intelligence.
The housekeeper listened to the praise of her domestic virtues with eyes immovably fixed on her elegant chemisette.
The man never trod ground whose virtues and services would have sustained him in that place that day, against such denunciation.
Joe always kept a supply of it in the cupboard; having a belief in its virtues correspondent to its nastiness.
This was soon done; but again, as I thus conned all those virtues which I was to expect united in one unhappy woman, the result was still unsatisfying, for I began to perceive that it was really not perfection that I was in search of.
There are men of low rank who strain themselves to bursting to pass for gentlemen, and high gentlemen who, one would fancy, were dying to pass for men of low rank; the former raise themselves by their ambition or by their virtues, the latter debase themselves by their lack of spirit or by their vices; and one has need of experience and discernment to distinguish these two kinds of gentlemen, so much alike in name and so different in conduct.
The virtues, also, such as justice, self-restraint, and so on, are not easily dislodged or dismissed, so as to give place to vice.
It is evident then that in the due government of a family, greater attention should be paid to the several members of it and their virtues than to the possessions or riches of it; and greater to the freemen than the slaves: but here some one may doubt whether there is any other virtue in a slave than his organic services, and of higher estimation than these, as temperance, fortitude, justice, and such-like habits, or whether they possess only bodily qualities: each side of the question has its difficulties; for if they possess these virtues, wherein do they differ from freemen?
But five of the other virtues which Pierre recalled, counting them on his fingers, he felt already in his soul: courage, generosity, morality, love of mankind, and especially obedience- which did not even seem to him a virtue, but a joy.
Socrates reminds Meno that this is only an enumeration of the virtues and not a definition of the notion which is common to them all.
And is not a similar method to be pursued about the virtues, which are also four in number?