hallucination

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Related to visual hallucination: schizophrenia
See: figment, insanity, phantom

HALLUCINATION, med. jur. It is a species of mania, by which "an idea reproduced by the memory is associated and embodied by the imagination." This state of mind is sometimes called delusion or waking dreams.
     2. An attempt has been made to distinguish hallucinations from illusions; the former are said to be dependent on the state of the intellectual organs and, the latter, on that of those of sense. Ray, Med. Jur. Sec. 99; 1 Beck, med. Jur. 538, note. An instance is given of a temporary hallucination in the celebrated Ben Johnson, the poet. He told a friend of his that he had spent many a night in looking at his great toe, about which he had seen Turks and Tartars, Romans and Carthagenians, fight, in his imagination. 1 Coll. on Lun. 34. If, instead of being temporary, this affection of his mind had been permanent, he would doubtless have been considered insane. See, on the subject of spectral illusions, Hibbert, Alderson and Farrar's Essays; Scott on Demonology, &c.; Bostock's Physiology, vol. 3, p. 91, 161; 1 Esquirol, Maladies Mentales, 159.

References in periodicals archive ?
Visual hallucinations and macular degeneration: an example of the Charles Bonnet syndrome.
The onset of visual hallucinations relative to the estimated onset of dementia was 1.
The analysis of the thematic content of visual hallucinations showed similar pattern with men and high social class visualizing mental or real images of people, whereas, women and low social class seeing either spirits or demons.
The clinical syndrome of PH consists of formed, vivid, highly colored visual hallucinations and is composed of formed and often animate objects.
Mental status examination is unremarkable other than the visual hallucinations.
Historically, visual hallucinations have been associated with the negative stigma of mental disorders.
In particular, cognitive fluctuations, visual hallucinations and idiopathic parkinsonism have a high rate of incidence and are considered to be core symptoms of the disease.
2003) Complex visual hallucinations in the visually impaired: The Charles Bonnet Syndrome, abstract.
The patient reports the presence of complex visual hallucinations ("there were people outside my window and they wanted to enter the house") and of complex auditory hallucinations ("somebody is calling my name; I can hear it loud and clear, but I fail to recognize the voice").
They can include visual hallucinations (seeing something that is not usually there) or auditory (hearing something that is not there).
He reported visual hallucinations that he believed to be real (i.
His visual disturbances had been interpreted as visual hallucinations.

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