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References in classic literature ?
And since we see clearly that the endowment of matter with vitality is a principle -- indeed, as far as our judgments extend, the leading principle in the operations of Deity, -- it is scarcely logical to imagine it confined to the regions of the minute, where we daily trace it, and not extending to those of the august.
The condition belongs to the geologic age--the great birth and growth of the world, when natural forces ran riot, when the struggle for existence was so savage that no vitality which was not founded in a gigantic form could have even a possibility of survival.
You seem to have a sort of genius for establishing relations with people--seempathy, I suppose, or animal magnetism, or youthful vitality, or something.
Tess was trying to lead a repressed life, but she little divined the strength of her own vitality.
During the early part of my stay I had been struck by the contrast between the vitality of the climate and the deadness of the community.
But we must never forget that Mamma, in spite of her wonderful vitality, is a very old woman.
I had fought almost continuously for many hours; I had passed through such experiences and adventures as must sap the vitality of man, and with all this I had not eaten for nearly twenty-four hours, nor slept.
Those new diseases that annually attack the products of the soil, those defective crops, those insufficient resources, are all signs of a vitality that is rapidly wearing out and of an approaching exhaustion.
He felt as one does in a serious illness when the vitality is so low that one is indifferent to the issue and wants only to be left alone.
He should have felt that his own sister was more original, and had greater vitality than Miss Hilbery had; but his main impression of Katharine now was of a person of great vitality and composure; and at the moment he could not perceive what poor dear Joan had gained from the fact that she was the granddaughter of a man who kept a shop, and herself earned her own living.
The less he used it the less would its vitality be spent.
With the last flickering spark of vitality that remained in her poor, exhausted body Virginia Maxon clung to the frail support that a kind Providence had thrust into her hands.