voluntary

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voluntary

adjective conative, deliberate, designed, discretionary, effected by choice, elective, facultative, free, intended, intentional, optional, purposeful, unaccidental, unbidden, uncoerced, uncompelled, unconstrained, unforced, unprompted, unrestrained, volens, volitient, volitional, volitionary, willful, without compulsion, without constraint
Associated concepts: voluntary abandonment, voluntary acceptance, voluntary act, voluntary agreement, voluntary appearance, voluntary assignment, voluntary confession, voluntary conveyance, voluntary discontinuance, voluntary dismissal, voluntary exposure, voluntary gift, voluntary grant, voluntary homocide, voluntary manslaughter, volunnary partition, voluntary payment, voluntary petition in bankruptcy, voluntary retirement, voluntary separation, voluntary statement, voluntary suspension, voluntary testiiony, voluntary trust, voluntary waste
See also: consenting, deliberate, gratis, gratuitous, spontaneous, unsolicited, willful, willing

VOLUNTARY. Willingly; done with one's consent; negligently. Wolff, Sec. 5.
     2. To render an act criminal or tortious it must be voluntary. If a man, therefore, kill another without a will on his part, while engaged in the performance of a lawful act, and having taken proper care to prevent it, he is not guilty of any crime. And if he commit an injury to the person or property of another, he is not liable for damages, unless the act has been voluntary or through negligence, as when a collision takes place between two ships without any fault in either. 2 Dobs. R. 83 3 Hagg. Adm. R. 320, 414.
     3. When the crime or injury happens in the performance of an unlawful act, the party will be considered as having acted voluntarily.
     4. A negligent escape permitted by an officer having the custody of a prisoner will be presumed as voluntary; under a declaration or count charging the escape to have been voluntary, the party will, therefore, be allowed to give a negligent escape in evidence. 1 Saund. 35, n. 1. So Will.

References in periodicals archive ?
On both models, it is difficult to see how there can be a borderline region of competence, knowledge, and voluntariness, where consent is neither morally valid nor invalid.
for challenges for ineffective assistance of counsel, voluntariness of
Furthermore, the court noted that "[t]he voluntariness of the statement is a threshold requirement.
Libertarians have something to learn, too, such as viewing voluntariness as not just requiring "choice" but also "autonomy" on the part of the chooser.
With the increasing number of court-mandated mediations, the value of voluntariness as a basis for professional ethics has somewhat diminished.
Some categories such as voluntariness and understanding were informed by the literature review, while others were data driven.
The paper goes on to demonstrate the sort of explanatory contribution that intentional action can make once it is no longer taken to be a target for reductive analysis, in explaining other, nonintentional kinds of action and voluntariness.
To my knowledge, no procedures or guidelines exist to help the clinician assess the voluntariness of a hunger strike, so I'm going to propose an assessment.
Finally, I proposed to "do away" with Miranda, to return to the voluntariness standard with one caveat: that the government be precluded from relying on a Miranda waiver to establish the voluntariness of a confession.
313) Moreover, "when a defendant challenges the voluntariness of a confession, the burden is on the government to show that a waiver of Miranda rights was the result of a defendant's own free and rational choice.
Chapters address the voluntariness standard, the Miranda approach, and the 6th Amendment right-to-counsel approach.
These are moderated by age, experience, gender and voluntariness.