vote

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vote

noun ballot, chirotony, choice, choosing, determination, election, formal expression of choice, judgment, option, pick, poll, predilection, preference, punctum, selection, sententia, suffragium

vote

verb approve, ballot, be counted, cast a ballot, cast a vote, choose, elect, exercise the right of suffrage, judge, poll, suffragium ferre
See also: cast, decide, franchise, plebiscite, poll, primary, referendum, register

VOTE. Suffrage; the voice of an individual in making a choice by many. The total number of voices given at an election; as, the presidential vote.
     2. Votes are either given, by ballot, v.) or viva voce; they may be delivered personally by the voter himself, or, in some cases, by proxy. (q.v.)
     3. A majority (q.v.) of the votes given carries the question submitted, unless in particular cases when the constitution or laws require that there shall be a majority of all the voters, or when a greater number than a simple majority is expressly required; as, for example in the case of the senate in making treaties by the president and senate, two-thirds of the senators present must concur. Vide Angell on Corpor. Index, h.t.
     4. When the votes are equal in number, the proposed measure is lost.

References in periodicals archive ?
Councillors also passed a vote of censure against Mr Armstrong-Braun for bringing Saltney Town Council into disrepute.
One example was a stunning vote of censure by the Palestinian parliament over corruption in various ministries and government bodies, but the vote was ignored and nothing was done.
John Newnham, writing in Viewpoints (July 27) about overpaid councillors' allowances, seems obsessed with the Conservative Party and goes on to suggest that my proposal that councillors who fail to repay would be more genuine if my party passed a vote of censure on its own members who are debtors.
If Senator Joseph McCarthy had been a petty or a vengeful man, he could have used the vote of censure to tear the Senate of the United States into bitter factions.
Forsey addressed the Byng-King crisis of 1926 in which Prime Minister King, during an adjournment of the debate in the House of Commons on what was deemed to be a want of confidence motion, asked the Governor General, Lord Byng, for a dissolution so that would not have to face (and lose) a vote of censure.