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WOUND, med. jur. This term, in legal medicine, comprehends all lesions of the body, and in this it differs from the meaning of the word when used in surgery. The latter only refers to a solution of continuity, while the former comprises not only these, but also every other kind of accident, such as bruises, contusions, fractures, dislocations, and the like. Cooper's Surgical Dict. h.t.; Dunglison's Med. Dict. h.t.; vide Dictionnaire des Sciences Medicales, mot Blessures 3 Fodere, Med. Leg. Sec. 687-811.
     2. Under the statute 9 Geo. IV. c. 21, sect. 12, it has been held in England, that to make a wound, in criminal cases, there must be "an injury to the person by which the skin is broken." 6 C. & P. 684; S. C. 19 Eng. C. L. Rep. 526. Vide Beck's Med. Jur. c. 15; Ryan's Med. Jur. Index, h.t.; Roscoe's Cr. Ev. 652; 19 Eng. Com. L. Rep. 425, 430, 526, 529; Dane's Ab. Index, h.t.; 1 Moody's Cr. Cas. 278; 4 C. & P. 381; S. C. 19 E. C. L. R. 430; 4 C. & P. 446; S. C. 19 E. C. L. R. 466; 1 Moody's Cr. C. 318; 4 C. & P. 558; S. C. 19 E. C. L. R. 526; Carr. Cr. L. 239; Guy, Med. Jur. ch. 9, p. 446; Merl. Repert. mot Blessure.
     3. When a person is found dead from wounds, it is proper to inquire whether they are the result of suicide, accident, or homicide. In making the examination, the greatest attention should be bestowed on all the circumstances. On this subject some general directions have been given under the article Death. The reader is referred to 2 Beck's Med. Jur. 68 to 93. As to, wounds on the living body, see Id. 188.

References in periodicals archive ?
quod idem Edwardus ^ <Oxley> adtunc et ibidem in manu sua dextra habuit prefatum Edwardum Calveley vnum vulnus ^ <mortale> in fronte suo de funditate (7) quartij vnius vncij adtunc dedit & predicti Iohannes Holmden Sidneus ffraunces & willelmus Beache adtunc et ibidem in affraia & insultu predictis existentes cum quibusdam baculis anglice billettes & staues valoris iij d.
Her death taught me to be(come) vulnerable, and now I see more clearly that, etymologically, beneath the word vulnerable there is the Latin word vulnus, i.
1, 288: "Quae proculdubio impia pietas non vulnus amputat, sed ut augeatur, fomitem subministrat, non perpetrati illiciti ausus praebet amaritudinem, sed perpetrandi potius tribuit libertatem.