way


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way

(Channel), noun alley, artery, avenue, custom, lane, mode, path, pathway, plan, road, roadway, route, throughway

way

(Manner), noun behavior, fashion, habit, means, progression, ritual
Associated concepts: way appurtenant, way by dedication, way of necessity, way reserved, wayfarer, waylay
See also: access, admission, admittance, arrangement, avenue, behavior, channel, condition, conduct, conduit, course, custom, demeanor, deportment, direction, entry, expedient, facility, form, habit, instrumentality, key, manner, method, mode, modus operandi, ploy, practice, presence, procedure, process, solution, state, style, system, temperament, treatment

WAY, estates. A passage, street or road. A right of way is a privilege which an individual or a particular description of persons, such as the inhabitants of a particular place, or the owners or occupiers of such place may have, of going over another person's ground.
     2. It is an incorporeal hereditament of a real nature, a mere easement, entirely different from public or private roads.
     3. A right of way may arise, 1. By prescription and immemorial usage. 2 McCord, 447 5 Har. & John. 474; Co. Litt. 113, b; Br. Chem. 2; 1 Roll. Ab. 936. 2. By grant. 3 Lev. 305; 1 Ld. Raym. 75; 17 Mass. 416; Crabb on R. P. Sec. 366. 3. By reservation 4. By custom. 5. By acts of the legislature. 6. From necessity, when a man's ground is enclosed and completely blocked up, so that he cannot, without passing over his neighbor's land, reach the public road. For example, should A grant a piece of land to B, surrounded by land belonging to A; a right of way over A's land passes of necessity to B, otherwise he could not derive any benefit from the acquisition. Vide 3 Rawle, 495; 2 Fairf. R. 1,56; 2 Mass. 203; 2 McCord, 448; 3 McCord, 139; 2 Pick. 577; 14 Mass. 56; 2 Hill, S. C. R. 641; and Necessity. The way is to be taken where it will be least injurious to the owner. 4 Kent, Com. 338. 4. Lord Coke, adopting the civil law, says there are three kinds of ways. 1. A foot-way, called iter. 2. A foot-way and horse-way, called adus. 3. A cart- way, which contains the other two, called via. Co. Lit. 56, a; Pothier, Pandectae, lib. 8, t. 3, Sec. 1; Dig. 8, 3; 1 Bro. Civ. Law, 177. Vide Yelv. 142, n; Id. 164; Woodf. Landl. & Ten. 544; 4 Kent, Com. 337; Ayl. Pand. 307; Cruise's Dig. tit. 24; 1 Taunt. R. 279; R. & M. 151; 1 Bail. R. 58; 2 Hill. Abr. c. 6; Crabb on Real Prop. Sec. 360 to 397; Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.; Easement; Servitude.

References in classic literature ?
There is ways to keep off some kinds of bad luck, but this wasn't one of them kind; so I never tried to do anything, but just poked along low-spirited and on the watch-out.
He arrived at the haunted house in disguise on the Wednesday before the advent of the twins--after writing his Aunt Pratt that he would not arrive until two days after--and laying in hiding there with his mother until toward daylight Friday morning, when he went to his uncle's house and entered by the back way with his own key, and slipped up to his room where he could have the use of the mirror and toilet articles.
Not but that it's a grand big place in a gloomy way, and Mr.
Making his way through the tainted crowd, dispersed up and down this hideous scene of action, with the skill of a man accustomed to make his way quietly, the messenger found out the door he sought, and handed in his letter through a trap in it.
But I could not submit to be thrown off in that way, and I made a passionate, almost an indignant, appeal to him to be more frank and manly with me.
My companion and I being undeceived by this terrible relation, thought it would be the highest imprudence to expose ourselves both together to a death almost certain and unprofitable, and agreed that I should go with our Abyssin and a Portuguese to observe the country; that if I should prove so happy as to escape being killed by the inhabitants, and to discover a way, I should either return, or send back the Abyssin or Portuguese.
The women and children of a man's retinue may be likened to a military unit for which he is responsible in various ways, as in matters of instruction, discipline, sustenance, and the exigencies of their continual roamings and their unending strife with other communities and with the red Martians.
It was not essential that he should plan his ways in regard to them.
The historians of culture are quite consistent in regard to their progenitors, the writers of universal histories, for if historical events may be explained by the fact that certain persons treated one another in such and such ways, why not explain them by the fact that such and such people wrote such and such books?
You can't think of all the subtle ways of grieving her I have.
I do not know; but in some way I am sure it can be accomplished.
So the only way to avoid a terrible battle was to explain the joke so they could understand it.