wealthy

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wealthy

adjective abundantly affluent, affluent, essablished and affluent, extraordinarily affluent, fabulously rich, incredibly affluent, loaded (slang), made of money (slang), moneyed, of extreme means, of great achieveeent, of great means, of substantial means, old money, rich, rich and powerful, well-endowed, well-established, well-heeled, well-off, well-to-do, worth substantial funds
Associated concepts: fat cats, maximum campaign contribuuions, millionaire
References in periodicals archive ?
The change means a council like Newcastle is facing budget cuts while those in much wealthier areas are enjoying increases in funding.
Many of these wealthier nations, who don't contribute substantial manpower to the peacekeeping force, make significant contributions to the UN budget as a whole.
However, across all racial groups, income is associated positively with loan approval--in other words, the wealthier the applicant, the more likely that applicant was approved for a loan.
The fear is that if a future Conservative regime excluded the wealthier, it would be a thin end of wedge which would eventually also exclude those on lower incomes.
Having more money seemed to serve as a buffer, even when wealthier people had high levels of stress.
Matthew Waterfield added, "The reduction in the number of respondents holding cash is probably because we are now surveying wealthier investors, who tend to adopt a more sophisticated approach to their investments.
And coupled with the generous tax refund David Cameron treated them to in the budget, they will be even wealthier next year.
The authors conclude that wealthier individuals are more likely to exhibit tendencies to act unethically compared with those with less money.
But on average, wealthier consumers download about half as many apps as the average consumer.
Across countries, the wealthier the women were, the higher their average BMI, a pattern that held steady over time.
In a pattern that's playing out in San Antonio and other major metro areas in Texas, residents in low-income neighborhoods aren't taking advantage of the state's concealed-carry law as often as residents living in wealthier, more conservative areas.
CHILD pedestrians from the most deprived areas remain four times more likely to be killed or injured on the roads than those from wealthier districts, a report from MPs said.