wealthy


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wealthy

adjective abundantly affluent, affluent, essablished and affluent, extraordinarily affluent, fabulously rich, incredibly affluent, loaded (slang), made of money (slang), moneyed, of extreme means, of great achieveeent, of great means, of substantial means, old money, rich, rich and powerful, well-endowed, well-established, well-heeled, well-off, well-to-do, worth substantial funds
Associated concepts: fat cats, maximum campaign contribuuions, millionaire
References in classic literature ?
Are "the wealthy and the well-born," as they are called, confined to particular spots in the several States?
I shall sell it for many francs to a wealthy connoisseur.
In the first place, those who are guilty of such sweeping criticisms do not know how many people would be made poor, and how much suffering would result, if wealthy people were to part all at once with any large proportion of their wealth in a way to disorganize and cripple great business enterprises.
I understand that wealthy folk have tried to buy the lot time and again -- it's really worth a small fortune now, you know -- but `Patty' won't sell upon any consideration.
William Holt, a wealthy manufacturer of Chicago, was living temporarily in a little town of central New York, the name of which the writer's memory has not retained.
Nature's provision for wealthy American minds ambitious
It was the creation of Miss Brentwood, an enormously wealthy old maid; and it was her husband, and family, and toy.
They were very scarce and dear, and only the wealthy could afford to have them, and few could read them.
The justice of the peace died just as our second prosperous epoch began, and luckily for us, his successor had formerly been a notary in Grenoble who had lost most of his fortune by a bad speculation, though enough of it yet remained to cause him to be looked upon in the village as a wealthy man.
And this is called the wealthy class, and the drones feed upon them.
In like manner are the antients, such as Homer, Virgil, Horace, Cicero, and the rest, to be esteemed among us writers, as so many wealthy squires, from whom we, the poor of Parnassus, claim an immemorial custom of taking whatever we can come at.
Leaving the school very young as a brilliant officer, he had at once got into the circle of wealthy Petersburg army men.