wear

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WEAR. A great dam made across a river, accommodated for the taking of fish, or to convey a stream to a mill. Jacob's Law Dict. h.t. Vide Dam.

References in classic literature ?
This rag of scarlet cloth -- for time, and wear, and a sacrilegious moth had reduced it to little other than a rag -- on careful examination, assumed the shape of a letter.
Never trust a woman who wears mauve, whatever her age may be, or a woman over thirty-five who is fond of pink ribbons.
Medium goods indulge in light trousers on week-days, and some of them even go so far as to wear fancy waistcoats.
She need not wear it if you object, for I know we promised to let you do what you liked with the poor dear for a year.
I must wear it more often than I have done of late, although it may not be the best of my collection.
at least I thought so; but I knew my mother always wore one when she went out, and all horses did when they were grown up; and so, what with the nice oats, and what with my master's pats, kind words, and gentle ways, I got to wear my bit and bridle.
Some wore them tipped rakishly to one side--these were your men of humor, jolly, free-and-easy dogs; some had them jammed independently down over their noses--these were your hard characters, thorough men, who, when they wore their hats, wanted to wear them, and to wear them just as they had a mind to; there were those who had them set far over back--wide-awake men, who wanted a clear prospect; while careless men, who did not know, or care, how their hats sat, had them shaking about in all directions.
Will your aunt Mirandy let you wear your best, or only your buff calico?
She has excellent reasons to wear it low, sir," remarked Mrs.
And they used to wear hooped petticoats of such enormous size that it was quite a journey to walk round them.
And to-day she thought more than usual about her neck and arms; for at the dance this evening she was not to wear any neckerchief, and she had been busy yesterday with her spotted pink-and-white frock, that she might make the sleeves either long or short at will.
Thursday was the day of the ball; and on Wednesday morning Fanny, still unable to satisfy herself as to what she ought to wear, determined to seek the counsel of the more enlightened, and apply to Mrs.