well-off


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Related to well-off: well-to-do

well-off

adjective booming, doing quite well, fortuitous, fortunate, halcyon, happy, moneyed, of adequate means, on top of the world, prosperous, successful, thriving, triumphant, wealthy
References in periodicals archive ?
While all income groups are more likely to say $50,000 to $100,000 is enough for an individual to live comfortably, the more they make, the more likely Americans are to say a higher income is what is necessary to be financially well-off.
It's no wonder those who are well-off feel confused and concerned about their families in the face of these concerns.
The report says smoking attributable deaths are twice as high for men and women in the most deprived areas as compared to the more well-off places.
There remains a very real fear that the tripling of fees could see our esteemed universities become virtual no-go areas for young local people from less well-off families.
The council's leaders feel poorer areas -such as Newcastle -are getting an unfair deal compared to well-off parts of the country.
He confirmed that free bus passes would stay, and then the interviewer said: "Ah, but some people are saying 'We're well-off, we don't need these passes'.
This shows their incompetence and contempt for those who are less well-off.
The bureau's deputy director Yu Xiuqin was quoted by Xinhua as saying Beijing has now become ''a moderately well-off city'' based on World Bank standards.
NEW Labour locally is asking post office users, who in the main are the least well-off and the elderly, to sign their petition against the closing of our post offices when they know only too well it's the Labour Party that is closing down our local post offices.
Her actual words were: "You expect shoplifting in cheap supermarkets but not in Waitrose, where most of the customers are relatively well-off and apparently law-abiding.
Chairman Sir Peter Lampl said educational opportunities still go disproportionately to well-off people.
In 1966, 42 percent of UCLA freshmen said it was essential or very important to be "very well-off financially.