SEA

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SEA

abbreviation for SINGLE EUROPEAN ACT.

SEA. The ocean; the great mass of waters which surrounds the land, and which probably extends from pole to pole, covering nearly three quarters of the globe. Waters within the ebb and flow of the tide, are to be considered the sea. Gilp. R. 526.
     2. The sea is public and common to all people, and every person has an equal right to navigate it, or to fish there; Ang. on Tide Wat. 44 to 49; Dane's Abr. c. 68, a. 3, 4; Inst. 2, 1, 1; and to land upon the sea, shore. (q.v.)
     3. Every nation has jurisdiction to the distance of a cannon shot, (q, v.) or marine league, over the water adjacent to its shore. 2 Cranch, 187, 234; 1 Circuit Rep. 62; Bynk. Qu. Pub. Juris. 61; 1 Azuni Mar. Law, 204; Id. 185; Vattel, 207:

References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Ashraf went to sea on Saturday for the first time in four days, following strong winds.
Putin, expected to easily win the March 14 election, went to sea on board the giant Arkhangelsk submarine on Monday to observe missile launches and flights of strategic bombers.
The son of a Scottish gardener who lacked the social connections to land a commission in the Royal Navy, Jones went to sea at age 13 as a lowly laborer, and quickly excelled as a seaman.
That doesn't explain why he wrote in the foreword: 'There cannot have been many, if any, women who went to sea as radio officers in the Merchant Navy during the Second World War.
He first went to sea as an eighteen-year-old apprentice in 1553.
LIFEBOATMEN Paul Giles and Ivan Parker saluted the people of Coventry and Warwickshire as they went to sea in a vessel many believed could not have been bought so quickly.
Other black colonists spoke Spanish, French, Dutch, or German, depending upon their location, and many went to sea, as Jeffrey Bolster demonstrates in his new book Black Jacks: African American Seamen in the Age of Sail (1997).
Although training schools existed for both officers and ratings, many still first went to sea without previous training.
A few years ago, I filmed an interview with a local merchant seaman, Joe Deacon, who first went to sea, aged 14, in 1942.
South Shields-born James decided to choose a different career path to his friends and, at the age of 16, rather than picking A-levels to study, he went to sea.
George Hodge, who went to sea as a 13-year-old cabin boy, kept his scrawled diaries and paintings during his life on the high seas.