whistleblower

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whistleblower

a person, usually an employee, who reveals information, which he is contractually obliged to keep secret, because of an overriding public interest. The principle was recently introduced into the UK by the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998, which has, for example, resulted in an accountant who was dismissed for exposing financial irregularities of his manager to the company headquarters in the USA being awarded not that much short of £300,000.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to him, it is only recently that the whistle-blowers provided information and talked of a 'Pangasinan group' that benefitted from two-thirds of the payment given to BURI.
While I can assure the reader that any effort to ascertain if the said sum was indeed paid to anyone, no one, or true / false whistle-blowers (or arrangee whistle-blowers, in the voice of late Fela Anikulapo Kuti) will be met with a state backed legislature - enacted brick wall, the crux of this piece is a critical analysis of Sagay's intervention that the Federal Government had refrained from paying the whistle-blower to prevent him from going mad.
The post Better law to protect whistle-blowers appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
Byline: COMMENT BY JOHN WILSON, Garda Whistle-blower and candidate for Cavan-Monaghan
Where a sporting organisation (or indeed any employer in the GCC) is faced with a whistle-blowing case it will have to, in the absence of legislation, rely on its own internal procedures in respect of the protection to afford to the whistle-blower and the procedures for moving forward with the investigation.
Employers may opt to reward whistle-blowers to encourage them, but that honesty should ideally not have to be paid for," Numann said.
This is perhaps not surprising given potential damages a tribunal can award a successful whistle-blower are unlimited where he/she has been unfairly dismissed for making a protected disclosure, as opposed to being limited to the lower of a year's gross pay or PS76,574 in a straight-forward unfair dismissal claim, and a tribunal will take into account a whistle-blower may struggle to gain new employment.
They warn: "Departments' own attempts at changing whistle-blowing policy and processes for the better have not been successful in modifying a bullying culture, or in combating unacceptable behaviour, such as harassment of whistle-blowers, within their organisations.
83% of whistle-blowers raise their concerns at least twice, usually internally
Thomas, who represents dozens of whistle-blowers reporting fraud to the Securities and Exchange Commission, said his original inspiration came as he slowly realized how many people in corporate America knew about wrongdoing.
In many cases, these whistle-blowers are women who, some studies report, are more inclined to value egalitarian, ethical workplaces over constructs like solidarity and toeing the line.