whistleblower

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whistleblower

a person, usually an employee, who reveals information, which he is contractually obliged to keep secret, because of an overriding public interest. The principle was recently introduced into the UK by the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998, which has, for example, resulted in an accountant who was dismissed for exposing financial irregularities of his manager to the company headquarters in the USA being awarded not that much short of £300,000.
References in periodicals archive ?
Villanueva said the launch of the whistle-blowing program, which the portal is now a part of, would help the GCG become more responsive to issues in the GOCC sector.
For instance, he said, government-controlled corporations, through the Governance Commission for Government-Owned or Controlled Corporations (GCG), have a whistle-blowing system for illegal and unethical conduct of officials.
As well-publicised cases such as Hillsborough and the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust inquiry have shown, whistle-blowing has become much more high profile," she said.
Both Robert Davies, head teacher at the time, and chair of the governors Chris Gore, admitted that during their time at the school staff had not been briefed on the whistle-blowing policy.
Whistle-blowing means disclosing organizational wrongdoings resulting in harm to third parties.
Whistle-blowing is considered to be a valuable tool in corporate governance strategy, as the reporting of incidences of misconduct helps maintain a safe workplace, while protecting profits and reputation.
Charles Robson, Head of Fraud Prevention Services at KPMG Lower Gulf said, "Due to the increasing realisation of the importance of whistle-blowing as an essential tool in an organization's anti-fraud and misconduct framework it has become integral to gain insights from subject matter experts in both implementing of whistle-blower programs and handling whistle-blower complaints.
There is undisputedly more work to be done on whistle-blowing.
Alan Tallentire, governor of HMP Durham at the time and regional custodial manager of the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) told the hearing: "The decision to dismiss was not taken lightly and it had nothing whatsoever to do with Mr Bennett and Mr Cramner's whistle-blowing activity.
The Social Partnership Forum and Public Concern at Work have published guidance on whistle-blowing in the NHS, providing advice on setting up arrangements that encourage an environment where staff feel comfortable reporting bad practice.
CROSBY-raised Cherie Blair's stepmother was branded a "f*** b***" after whistle-blowing about a "chaotic" charity where she worked as a teacher, an employment tribunal heard.
A case in the US has highlighted the need to protect whistle-blowing nurses.