white collar crime


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white collar crime

n. a generic term for crimes involving commercial fraud, cheating consumers, swindles, insider trading on the stock market, embezzlement and other forms of dishonest business schemes. The term comes from the out of date assumption that business executives wear white shirts and ties. It also theoretically distinguishes these crimes and criminals from physical crimes, supposedly likely to be committed by "blue collar" workers.

References in periodicals archive ?
He is a well-known expert in the field of white collar crime, civil and criminal law procedure, asset tracing and recovery, governmental investigations, AML, internal audits intended to verify alleged irregularities, compliance and regulatory issues.
Sirota, David, "US Prosecution of White Collar Crime Hits 20-Year Low," International Business Times, August 4, 2015.
Welcome to the Twenty-Ninth Annual Survey of White Collar Crime.
An introduction to corporate and white collar crime.
White Collar crime remains a topic of perennial concern as criminals continue to evolve and their crimes continue to proliferate.
He said: "I attach the highest priority to the full investigation of white collar crime and bringing the perpetrators of such crime to justice.
Although she said she didn't think she was related to the person, the attorney general said white collar crime has been occurring for many years.
legislation and prosecution of white collar crime is a subject of
There is little political incentive to document the costs and impacts of white collar crime because this would mean an increase in the overall level of victimisation recorded in the UK.
Gil Geis, a retired professor at UCI is an authority on white collar crime and author of several books and periodicals on the subject including his seminal "White Collar Crime: Offenses in Business, Politics and The Professions".
The IFP's intellectual partners--the FBI, the GAO, the Better Business Bureau, the National White Collar Crime Center and the U.
Any business concerned about white collar crime, government rules, and legal intervention will find TRAPPED offers much food for thought.