widower

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widower

n. a man whose wife died while he was married to her and has not remarried.

widower

a man whose wife has died and who has not remarried.

WIDOWER. A man whose wife is dead. A widower has a right to administer to his wife's separate estate, and as her administrator to collect debts due to her, generally for his own use.

References in periodicals archive ?
Many widowers, surviving civil partners and same-sex spouses are losing out or may lose out on thousands of pounds worth of retirement income because of ongoing discrimination in the pensions system that successive governments have failed to put right.
As you know we have many widows, widowers and orphaned children that need our help- be it with food, clothing, educational support, school uniforms and the like.
Noting how most research on widowers focuses on the grieving process, she instead investigates the social meaning of being a widower and how men describe their experiences in ways that protect their sense of masculinity.
The discrepancy came about because contributions made by deceased female partners before April 6, 1988, are discounted from pensions paid to widowers.
How many people do you know who are widowers at 30?
Widows and widowers of service personnel whose spouses died as a result of an injury or illness attributable to their military service, and who are in receipt of a UK war widow or widower's pension, are also eligible.
A MERSEYSIDE man has lost an eight-year campaign for equal rights for widowers.
If the ruling had gone in Mr Hooper's favour, it would have set a groundbreaking precedent for thousands of widowers who claim they have been discriminated against by the Government.
near Eglin Air Force Base, provides rent subsidy and other support to indigent widows and widowers of retired enlisted Airmen 55 and older.
Nieboer, Lindenberg, and Ormel (1999) found that older widowers scored considerably lower on measures of well-being than older widows for two years of bereavement following the death of a spouse.
Widowers are more uncomfortable than widows in planning social interactions and seeking help when needed (Lieberman, 1996; Lopata, 1982), and they are vulnerable to loneliness (Dykstra, 1995; Lund, Caserta, & Dimond, 1986; Stevens, 1995) and depressive symptoms during bereavement (Byrne & Raphael, 1999, Farberow, Gallagher, Gilewski, & Thompson, 1992; Lee, DeMaris, Bavin, & Sullivan, 2001).
Hundreds of would-be widows and widowers have applied for matrimony since.