widow

(redirected from widows)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to widows: Windows, Windows Live, Windows Update, Microsoft

widow

n. a woman whose husband died while she was married to him and has not since remarried. A divorced woman whose ex-husband dies is not a widow, except for the purpose of certain Social Security benefits traceable to the ex-husband.

widow

a woman who has survived her husband.

WIDOW. An unmarried woman whose husband is dead.
     2. In legal writings, widow is an addition given to a woman who is unmarried and whose husband is dead. The addition of spinster is given to a woman who never was married. Lovel. on Wills, 269. See Addition. As to the rights of a widow, seq Dower.

References in classic literature ?
The best representative of the forlorn company whose day would be brightened by a bunch of anemones was, in Katharine's opinion, the widow of a general living in the Cromwell Road.
There's an old widow in her room, somewhere, let us suppose in the suburbs of Leeds.
He recalled the promises to the widow and the fatherless, and asked God to smooth the way before this widow and her children, and to `incline the hearts of men to deal justly with her.
The Widow Douglas she took me for her son, and allowed she would sivilize me; but it was rough living in the house all the time, considering how dismal regular and decent the widow was in all her ways; and so when I couldn't stand it no longer I lit out.
The widow was ready, Rowena was ready, so also were the foreigners.
The Widow Douglas' splendid hospitality was a tempting bait.
Simpson was absent from the home circle for the moment because he had exchanged the Widow Rideout's sleigh for Joseph Goodwin's plough.
Toward the close of the same day, Rob paused hungry and weary at the cottage of a poor widow who dwelt upon the outskirts of the forest.
The widow was as complete a contrast to her third bridegroom, in everything but age, as can well be conceived.
Twelve years had changed Anne from the blooming, silent, unformed girl of fifteen, to the elegant little woman of seven-and-twenty, with every beauty except bloom, and with manners as consciously right as they were invariably gentle; and twelve years had transformed the fine-looking, well-grown Miss Hamilton, in all the glow of health and confidence of superiority, into a poor, infirm, helpless widow, receiving the visit of her former protegee as a favour; but all that was uncomfortable in the meeting had soon passed away, and left only the interesting charm of remembering former partialities and talking over old times.
My dear Celia," said Lady Chettam, "a widow must wear her mourning at least a year.
But the widow has a little income of seventy pounds in her own right.