wife

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wife

a married woman.

WIFE, domestic relations. A woman who has a husband.
     2. A wife, as such, possesses rights and is liable to obligations. These will be considered. 1st. She may make contracts for the purchase of real estate for her own benefit, unless her husband expressly dissents. 6 Binn. R. 427. And she is entitled to a legacy directly given to her for her separate use. 6 Serg. & Rawle, R. 467. In some places, by statutory provision, she may act as a feme sole trader, and as such acquire personal property. 2 Serg. & Rawle, R. 289.
     3. 2d. She may in Pennsylvania, and in most other states, convey her interest in her own or her husband's lands by deed acknowledged in a form prescribed by law. 8 Dowl. R. 630.
     4.-3d. She is under obligation to love, honor and obey her husband and is bound to follow him wherever he may desire to establish himself: 5 N. S. 60; (it is presumed not out of the boundaries of the United States,) unless the husband, by acts of injustice and such as are contrary to his marital duties, renders her life or happiness insecure.
     5.-4th. She is not liable for any obligations she enters into to pay money on any contract she makes, while she lives with her husband; she is presumed in such case to act as the agent of her husband. Chitty, Contr. 43
     6.-5th. The incapacities of femes covert, apply to their civil rights, and are intended for their protection and interest. Their political rights stand upon different grounds, they can, therefore, acquire and lose a national character. These rights stand upon the general principles of the law of nations. Harp. Eq. R. 5 3 Pet. R. 242.
     7.-6th. A wife, like all other persons, when she acts with freedom, may be punished for her criminal acts. But the law presumes, when she commits in his presence a crime, not malum in se, as murder or treason, that she acts by the command and coercion of her husband, and, upon this ground, she is exempted from punishment. Rose. on Cr. Ev. 785. But this is only a presumption of law, and if it appears, upon the evidence, that she did not in fact commit the act under compulsion, but was herself a principal actor and inciter in it, she may be punished. 1 Hale, P. C. 516; 1 Russ. on Cr. 16, 20. Vide Contract; Divorce; Husband; Incapacity; Marriage; Necessaries; Parties to actions; Parties to contracts; Women and, generally, Bouv. Inst. Index,

References in periodicals archive ?
I therefore argue that wifehood is the greatest burden of womanhood in Nigeria and the most volatile gender space in dire need of social transformation.
As in the novels of Nwapa, Buchi Emecheta's novels also attempt to construct a new female identity that confronts traditional conceptions of wifehood and motherhood as the sole and inescapable fate of African womanhood.
Her woman-becoming passes through points of wifehood and motherhood, across the shifting matrices of familial configurations.
22) Yet, her further observation that "by emphasizing the 'prison' of the zenana and the liberating power of Christian motherhood and wifehood, BZM missionaries discursively imprisoned themselves and became effectively unable to criticize gender inequalities in British society" is not quite accurate.
It "cannot be seriously argued," Harlan opined, "that one who has committed this 'shameless offense against wifehood,' should be permitted to prevent his wife from testifying to the crime by invoking an interest founded on the marital relation or the desire of the law to protect it.
Motherhood with wifehood might have been wonderful; motherhood sans spouse was still an awesome state.
In traditional Catholic social teaching, we see that motherhood, wifehood, and homemaker are the proper manifestations of womanhood according to the natural law.
Thus, despite the system of arranged marriages and the reality of women's and men's different personal and economic interests, a woman was likely to find wifehood a satisfying career if her husband was neither abusive nor a poor fiscal manager.
Critics of accomplishments in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries contended that these fashionable pursuits taught young women to seek praise through self-display rather than to cultivate virtues appropriate to wifehood and motherhood.
Unexpectedly, Charite does live up to Tlepolemus' fictional ideal of wifehood, but in doing so becomes a fiction herself.
One learns more than one may have ever wanted to know about Hoyt's California youth, her World War II six-month marriage and widowhood, her remarriages, traditional wifehood and motherhood, two divorces, her freelance journalism, and then her Peace Corps position as director of radio and television during the Lyndon Johnson era.
Ideology, promulgated by the learned few, and predominantly male, writers of the period extolled the virtues of wifehood and motherhood for women, but, in most cases, the gap between ideal and reality was wide.