word


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to word: word finder, Word games, Open Office

word

(News), noun account, advice, bulletin, communication, dispatch, information, intelligence, mention, message, report, statement

word

(Promise), noun affirmation, agreement, averment, avouchment, avowal, declaration, pledge, profession, solemn declaration, statement, undertaking, vow, warrant

word

(Term), noun adage, antonym, argument, coined word, colloquy, command, contention, dialogue, discourse, expression, homonym, maxim, mot, motto, observation, palaver, parlay, part of speech, phrase, proverb, remark, saying, statement, utterance, verbalism
Associated concepts: actionable words, words of art, words of limitation
See also: canon, declaration, disclosure, expression, intelligence, news, phrase, pledge, profession, promise, remark, term, undertaking, vow

WORD, construction. One or more syllables which when united convey an idea a single part of speech.
     2. Words are to be understood in a proper or figurative sense, and they are used both ways in law. They are also used in a technical sense. It is a general rule that contracts and wills shall be construed as the parties understood them; every person, however, is presumed to understand the force of the words be uses, and therefore technical words must be taken according to their legal import, even in wills, unless the testator manifests a clear intention to the contrary. 1 Bro. C. C. 33; 3 Bro. C. C. 234; 5 Ves. 401 8 Ves. 306.
     3. Every one is required to use words in the sense they are generally understood, for, as speech has been given to man to be a sign of his thoughts, for the purpose of communicating them to others, he is bound in treating with them, to use such words or signs in the sense sanctioned by usage, that is, in the sense in which they themselves understand them, or else he deceives them. Heinnec. Praelect. in Puffendorff, lib. 1, cap. 17, Sec. 2 Heinnec. de Jure Nat. lib. 1, Sec. 197; Wolff, lust. Jur. Nat. Sec. 7981.
     4. Formerly, indeed, in cases of slander, the defamatory words received the mildest interpretation of which they were susceptible, and some ludicrous decisions were the consequence. It was gravely decided, that to say of a merchant, "he is a base broken rascal, has broken twice, and I will make him break a third time," that no action could be maintained, because it might be intended that he had a hernia: ne poet dar porter action, car poet estre intend de burstness de belly. Latch, 104. But now they are understood in their usual signification. Comb. 37; Ham. N. P. 282. Vide Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.; Construction; Interpretation.

References in classic literature ?
That seems descriptive enough, but still it is not exact enough for a German; so he precedes the word with that article which indicates that the creature to follow is feminine, and writes it down thus: "die Engla"nderinn,"--which means "the she-Englishwoman.
Every thing declared it; his own attentions, his father's hints, his motherinlaw's guarded silence; it was all in unison; words, conduct, discretion, and indiscretion, told the same story.
Clare, before a word could be uttered by the astonished family.
Half words are better than whole ones in this land of ours.
The curate, who was aware of his misfortune and recognised him by the description, being a man of good address, approached him and in a few sensible words entreated and urged him to quit a life of such misery, lest he should end it there, which would be the greatest of all misfortunes.
If you cannot tell your right side from your left, I fear that no words of mine can make my meaning clear to you.
Sometimes too we qualify the metaphor by adding the term to which the proper word is relative.
faintly murmured Fernand, but the word seemed to die away on his pale agitated lips, and a convulsive spasm passed over his countenance.
It is because I want never to have to say or hear another word about anything that is past and over.
For a long time he could not utter a word, so that the Rhetor had to repeat his question.
Now "God" was no word in Jerry's vocabulary, despite the fact that he already possessed a definite and fairly large vocabulary.
He was cheered to read in BOOK NEWS, in a paragraph on the payment of magazine writers, not that Rudyard Kipling received a dollar per word, but that the minimum rate paid by first-class magazines was two cents a word.