word

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word

(News), noun account, advice, bulletin, communication, dispatch, information, intelligence, mention, message, report, statement

word

(Promise), noun affirmation, agreement, averment, avouchment, avowal, declaration, pledge, profession, solemn declaration, statement, undertaking, vow, warrant

word

(Term), noun adage, antonym, argument, coined word, colloquy, command, contention, dialogue, discourse, expression, homonym, maxim, mot, motto, observation, palaver, parlay, part of speech, phrase, proverb, remark, saying, statement, utterance, verbalism
Associated concepts: actionable words, words of art, words of limitation
See also: canon, declaration, disclosure, expression, intelligence, news, phrase, pledge, profession, promise, remark, term, undertaking, vow

WORD, construction. One or more syllables which when united convey an idea a single part of speech.
     2. Words are to be understood in a proper or figurative sense, and they are used both ways in law. They are also used in a technical sense. It is a general rule that contracts and wills shall be construed as the parties understood them; every person, however, is presumed to understand the force of the words be uses, and therefore technical words must be taken according to their legal import, even in wills, unless the testator manifests a clear intention to the contrary. 1 Bro. C. C. 33; 3 Bro. C. C. 234; 5 Ves. 401 8 Ves. 306.
     3. Every one is required to use words in the sense they are generally understood, for, as speech has been given to man to be a sign of his thoughts, for the purpose of communicating them to others, he is bound in treating with them, to use such words or signs in the sense sanctioned by usage, that is, in the sense in which they themselves understand them, or else he deceives them. Heinnec. Praelect. in Puffendorff, lib. 1, cap. 17, Sec. 2 Heinnec. de Jure Nat. lib. 1, Sec. 197; Wolff, lust. Jur. Nat. Sec. 7981.
     4. Formerly, indeed, in cases of slander, the defamatory words received the mildest interpretation of which they were susceptible, and some ludicrous decisions were the consequence. It was gravely decided, that to say of a merchant, "he is a base broken rascal, has broken twice, and I will make him break a third time," that no action could be maintained, because it might be intended that he had a hernia: ne poet dar porter action, car poet estre intend de burstness de belly. Latch, 104. But now they are understood in their usual signification. Comb. 37; Ham. N. P. 282. Vide Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.; Construction; Interpretation.

References in periodicals archive ?
To have him sing Welsh songs in word-perfect Welsh was brilliant' It is a wonderful show this year, full of wonderful Welsh views and scenes.
Laura Bray, aged 15, was word-perfect as outspoken schoolgirl Linda in the Willy Russell comedy Our Day Out.
Not one for the history books, though, Motson was otherwise word-perfect, unlike the loathesome Ian Wright, who had to be rebuked by Gary Lineker for a crass comment.
After receiving a signed football in the ballot, the lively Kelly grabbed the microphone and launched into a word-perfect rendition of Brown Eyed Girl complete with the full backing of resident band Sunshine.
But tall tales on this scale are a mortal sin - and say more about the bishop's character than a million word-perfect masses ever could.