word

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word

(News), noun account, advice, bulletin, communication, dispatch, information, intelligence, mention, message, report, statement

word

(Promise), noun affirmation, agreement, averment, avouchment, avowal, declaration, pledge, profession, solemn declaration, statement, undertaking, vow, warrant

word

(Term), noun adage, antonym, argument, coined word, colloquy, command, contention, dialogue, discourse, expression, homonym, maxim, mot, motto, observation, palaver, parlay, part of speech, phrase, proverb, remark, saying, statement, utterance, verbalism
Associated concepts: actionable words, words of art, words of limitation
See also: canon, declaration, disclosure, expression, intelligence, news, phrase, pledge, profession, promise, remark, term, undertaking, vow

WORD, construction. One or more syllables which when united convey an idea a single part of speech.
     2. Words are to be understood in a proper or figurative sense, and they are used both ways in law. They are also used in a technical sense. It is a general rule that contracts and wills shall be construed as the parties understood them; every person, however, is presumed to understand the force of the words be uses, and therefore technical words must be taken according to their legal import, even in wills, unless the testator manifests a clear intention to the contrary. 1 Bro. C. C. 33; 3 Bro. C. C. 234; 5 Ves. 401 8 Ves. 306.
     3. Every one is required to use words in the sense they are generally understood, for, as speech has been given to man to be a sign of his thoughts, for the purpose of communicating them to others, he is bound in treating with them, to use such words or signs in the sense sanctioned by usage, that is, in the sense in which they themselves understand them, or else he deceives them. Heinnec. Praelect. in Puffendorff, lib. 1, cap. 17, Sec. 2 Heinnec. de Jure Nat. lib. 1, Sec. 197; Wolff, lust. Jur. Nat. Sec. 7981.
     4. Formerly, indeed, in cases of slander, the defamatory words received the mildest interpretation of which they were susceptible, and some ludicrous decisions were the consequence. It was gravely decided, that to say of a merchant, "he is a base broken rascal, has broken twice, and I will make him break a third time," that no action could be maintained, because it might be intended that he had a hernia: ne poet dar porter action, car poet estre intend de burstness de belly. Latch, 104. But now they are understood in their usual signification. Comb. 37; Ham. N. P. 282. Vide Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t.; Construction; Interpretation.

References in periodicals archive ?
This afternoon's King George is a terrific race as ever but not one that requires a lot of wordage.
Reading a Farrell sentence requires an appetite for more wordage than is strictly necessary: "Nothing remained of that past now but scars and wounds, agonies, frustrations, lacerations, sufferings, death.
So feast your eyes on the PW-9300: 22 dictionaries' worth of wordage for your delectation and delight.
I should like to end with a comment on Dr J K Haken's article 'One Hundred years ago--Development of the Colonial Military Police', in New South Wales 1854-1903' which has given rise unwittingly to all this wordage.
There seems to be no excess wordage in the descriptions of the facts and/or premises upon which each malpractice situation turns.
Without this wordage we might well have the condition imagined by the little girl who asked, "Suppose they gave a war and nobody came?
Even while bestowing this gift of obtuse wordage, Rosen shamelessly takes aim at traditional journalism's supposedly harmful obsession with concepts like balance, objectivity and adversity.
Carducci discounts as peripheral almost everything on which rock crits expend 95 percent of their wordage, i.
Spackman had declared in his essay on James that he could find in The Ambassadors nothing to admire at all, partly because the male characters took up so much of the wordage.