References in classic literature ?
Am I, or am I not, worthy of your confidence in me?
drink wassail to the fair Rowena; for since her namesake introduced the word into England, has never been one more worthy of such a tribute.
Though the offering we present to you is unworthy of your notice, we pray you to accept it as a mark of the esteem and friendship which we cherish for you, and of which we gladly send you this token, and we ask of you a like regard if you deem us worthy of it.
These are the curious things I told you I had to tell, and if you don't think them so, I have got no others;" and with this the worthy fellow brought his story to a close.
The knight should have a suit worthy of his rank, master--think you not so?
This fact is worthy of remark at a period when physiology is so busy with the human heart.
Very well, my worthy harpooner, if some vertebrate, several hundred yards long, and large in proportion, can maintain itself in such depths-- of those whose surface is represented by millions of square inches, that is by tens of millions of pounds, we must estimate the pressure they undergo.
The company soon retired, and now the worthy trapper found indeed that he had no green girl to deal with; for the knowing dame at once assumed the style and dignity of a trapper's wife: taking possession of the lodge as her undisputed empire, arranging everything according to her own taste and habitudes, and appearing as much at home and on as easy terms with the trapper as if they had been man and wife for years.
Yet more than worthy of the love My spirit struggled with, and strove, When, on the mountain peak, alone, Ambition lent it a new tone - I had no being - but in thee: The world, and all it did contain In the earth - the air - the sea - Its joy - its little lot of pain That was new pleasure -- the ideal, Dim, vanities of dreams by night - And dimmer nothings which were real -(Shadows - and a more shadowy light
is absolutely on the catch for a husband, and no one therefore can pity her for losing, by the superior attractions of another woman, the chance of being able to make a worthy man completely wretched.
It is worthy the observing, that there is no passion in the mind of man, so weak, but it mates, and masters, the fear of death; and therefore, death is no such terrible enemy, when a man hath so many attendants about him, that can win the combat of him.
This young nobleman appears to me extremely worthy to succeed the valiant gentleman of whom I am the friend and very humble servant.