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Wrong

A violation, by one individual, of another individual's legal rights.

The idea of rights suggests the opposite idea of wrongs, for every right is capable of being violated. For example, a right to receive payment for goods sold implies a wrong on the part of the person who owes, but does not make payment. In the most general point of view, the law is intended to establish and maintain rights, yet in its everyday application, the law must deal with rights and wrongs. The law first fixes the character and definition of rights, and then seeks to secure these rights by defining wrongs and devising the means to prevent these wrongs or provide for their redress.

The Criminal Law is charged with preventing and punishing public wrongs. Public wrongs are violations of public rights and duties that affect the whole community.

A private wrong, also called a civil wrong, is a violation of public or private rights that injures an individual and consequently is subject to civil redress or compensation. A civil wrong that is not based on breach of contract is a tort. Torts include assault, Battery, libel, slander, intentional infliction of mental distress, and damage to property. The same act or omission that makes a tort may also be a breach of contract, but it is the Negligence, not the breaking of the contract, that is the tort. For example, if a lawyer is negligent in representing his client, the lawyer may be sued both for Malpractice, which is a tort, and for breach of the attorney-client contract.

The word wrongful is attached to numerous types of injurious conduct. For example, wrongful death is a type of lawsuit brought on behalf of a deceased person's beneficiaries that alleges that the death was attributable to the willful or negligent conduct of another. However, even in these special contexts, the words wrong, wrongful, and wrongfully do not sharply delineate the exact nature of the wrongness. Their presence merely signifies that something bad has occurred.

wrong

noun abomination, abuse, atrocity, crime, delinquency, dereliction, evil, grievance, harm, illegality, immorality, improbity, infraction, iniquity, iniuria, injury, lawlessness, malfeasance, malpractice, miscreancy, misdoing, mistake, mistreatment, obliquity, offense, outrage, sin, transgression, trespass, turpitude, unfairness, vice, villainy, violation, violation of right, wickedness
Foreign phrases: Scienti et volenti non fit injuria.A wrong is not done to a person who understands and consents. Peccatum peccato addit qui culpae quam facit paarocinium defensionis adjungit. He adds one offense to another who connects a wrong which he has committed with his defense. Nemo ex suo delicto meliorem suam conditionem facere potest. No one can improve his connition by his own misdeed. Nemo ex proprio dolo connequitur actionem. No one acquires a right of action from his own fraud. Un ne doit prise advantage de son tort demesne. One ought not to take advantage of his own wrong. Nemo damnum facit, nisi qui id fecit quod facere jus non habet. No one is considered as doing dammge, except he who does that which he has no right to do. Jus ex injuria non oritur. A right does not arise from a wrong. Injuria non excusat injuriam. One wrong does not excuse another. Ubi et dantis et accipientis turpitudo versatur, non posse repeti dicimus; quotiens autem accipientis turpitudo versatur, repeti posse. Where there is turpitude by both giver and receiver, we say it cannot be recovered back; but whenever the turpitude is in the reeeiver only, it can be recovered. Ubicunque est injuria, ibi damnum sequitur. Wherever there is a wrong, there damage follows. Nullum iniquum est praesumendum in jure. Nothing iniquitous is to be presumed in law. Nullus videtur dolo facere qui suo jure utitur. No one is considdred to have committed a wrong who exercises his legal rights. Aliquid conceditur ne injuria remaneat impunita, quod alias non concederetur. Something is conceded, lest a wrong remain unredressed, which otherwise would not be conceded.
See also: abuse, arrant, at fault, blame, blameworthy, crime, culpability, culpable, damage, delict, delinquency, disservice, errant, erroneous, fallacious, false, faulty, felonious, grievance, ground, guilt, harm, harrow, heinous, illicit, immoral, impermissible, improper, inaccurate, inadmissible, inadvisable, inapplicable, inapposite, incorrect, infraction, infringement, iniquitous, injure, injury, injustice, inopportune, irregular, maltreat, mendacious, mens rea, mischief, misconduct, misdeed, misdemeanor, misdoing, misfeasance, mishandle, mistreat, nefarious, objectionable, onerous, peccant, persecute, perverse, prejudice, reprehensible, sinister, sophistic, tort, transgression, unethical, unfit, unjust, unjustifiable, unseemly, unsound, unsustainable, untenable, untrue, vice, vicious, violate, violation, wrongful

WRONG. An injury; (q.v.) a tort (q.v.) a violation of right. In its most usual sense, wrong signifies an injury committed to the person or property of another, or to his relative rights, unconnected with contract; and these wrongs are committed with or without force. But in a more extended signification, wrong includes the violation of a contract; a failure by a man to perform his undertaking or promise is a wrong or injury to him to whom it was made. 3 Bl. Com. 158.
     2. Wrongs are divided into public and private. 1. A public wrong is an act which is injurious to the public generally, commonly known by the name of crime, misdemeanor, or offence, and it is punishable in various ways, such as indictments, summary proceedings, and upon conviction by death, imprisonment, fine, &c. 2. Private wrongs, which are injuries to individuals, unaffecting the public: these are redressed by actions for damages, &c.

References in classic literature ?
As it is evident that my people have advised me wrongly, I will not cast you three people into the dreadful Garden of the Clinging Vines; but your animals must be driven into the Black Pit in the mountain, for my subjects cannot bear to have them around.
 Ye wrongly interpret the names that they bear.
Of course he guessed wrongly, and of course he at once became an ornament.
SOCRATES: And the wise soul guides them rightly, and the foolish soul wrongly.
Complying, Richardson discovered the possibilities of the letter form as a means of telling stories, and hence proceeded to write his first novel, 'Pamela, [Footnote: He wrongly placed the accent on the first syllable.
He uttered the name of the cousin--the man, you remember, who did not approve of the Fynes, and whom rightly or wrongly little Fyne suspected of interested motives, in view of de Barral having possibly put away some plunder, somewhere before the smash.
This entire allegory, I said, you may now append, dear Glaucon, to the previous argument; the prison-house is the world of sight, the light of the fire is the sun, and you will not misapprehend me if you interpret the journey upwards to be the ascent of the soul into the intellectual world according to my poor belief, which, at your desire, I have expressed whether rightly or wrongly God knows.
The red-faced shopman regarded him with an eye of menace; but he continued gaily, swinging his cane, "Why," he pursued, "why are two tickets wrongly placed in a greengrocer's shop like a shovel hat that has come to London for a holiday?
More battles than Waterloo have been won on our playing-fields, and Margaret bowed to a charm of which she did not wholly approve, and said nothing when the Oxford colleges were identified wrongly.
But very wrongly, as I was soon to see; for I had not been half an hour at the inn (standing in the door most of the time, to ease my eyes from the peat smoke) when a thunderstorm came close by, the springs broke in a little hill on which the inn stood, and one end of the house became a running water.
It was the mere reading of the sentence--of the crime she had long ago been guilty--the crime of loving wrongly, too violently, against reason.
The present question for us to decide is, whether I am wrongly attaching a meaning to a mere accident?