yard


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See: close, curtilage

YARD. A measure of length, containing three feet, or thirty-six inches.

YARD, estates. A piece of land enclosed for the use and accommodation of the inhabitants of a house. In England it is nearly synonymous with backside. (q.v.) 1 Chitty, Pr. 176; 1 T. R. 701.

References in classic literature ?
The last house in Bleeding Heart Yard which she had described as his place of habitation, was a large house, let off to various tenants; but Plornish ingeniously hinted that he lived in the parlour, by means of a painted hand under his name, the forefinger of which hand (on which the artist had depicted a ring and a most elaborate nail of the genteelest form) referred all inquirers to that apartment.
From time to time there were public complaints, pathetically going about, of labour being scarce--which certain people seemed to take extraordinarily ill, as though they had an absolute right to it on their own terms--but Bleeding Heart Yard, though as willing a Yard as any in Britain, was never the better for the demand.
Ask for Lantern Yard, father--ask this gentleman with the tassels on his shoulders a-standing at the shop door; he isn't in a hurry like the rest," said Eppie, in some distress at her father's bewilderment, and ill at ease, besides, amidst the noise, the movement, and the multitude of strange indifferent faces.
Eh, my child, he won't know anything about it," said Silas; "gentlefolks didn't ever go up the Yard.
The housekeeper obeyed with great satisfaction, and the worthy "Esplandian" went flying into the yard to await with all patience the fire that was in store for him.
And gathering up the leather reins fastened together by a brass ring, Nikita took the driver's seat and started the impatient horse over the frozen manure which lay in the yard, towards the gate.
That is Jacobson's Yard," said Holmes, pointing to a bristle of masts and rigging on the Surrey side.
She and Mavra Kuzminichna tried to get as many of the wounded as possible into their yard.
If we ran out and questioned him as he was slipping through the yard, he would merely work his shoulders about in his coat and say,
He appeared as tall as an ordinary spire steeple, and took about ten yards at every stride, as near as I could guess.
and clattering and thundering over the stones two horses dashed into the yard with a heavy engine behind them.
Having set some of the "boys" to cut off the best of the giraffe's meat, we went to work to build a "scherm" near one of the pools and about a hundred yards to its right.