yawning


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Titled 'A neural basis for contagious yawning,' the study conducted by the researchers from the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom was published Thursday in the academic journal Current Biology.
Experts at the University of Nottingham have published research that suggests the human propensity for contagious yawning is triggered automatically by primitive reflexes in the primary motor cortex -- an area of the brain responsible for motor function.
Fluoxetine was increased to 40 mg and he was reviewed after 4 months when he reported clear and significant improvement in his depression but complained of "excessive yawning spells" causing him problems at his work place.
Gwynnie has once again been spreading her profound knowledge, this time advising her website disciples on the benefits of yawning.
Sometimes, yawning is a psychological response to seeing someone else yawn.
Common belief is that yawning helps to increase the oxygen supply.
Matthew Campbell and Frans de Waal, both of Emory University in Atlanta, treated chimps' tendency to yawn when viewing videos of others yawning as a sign of spontaneous empathy.
Contagious yawning is linked more closely to a person's age than their ability to empathise, as previously thought, BBC health reported.
The mechanism behind contagious yawning remains one of life's great mysteries.
If you have a dog, be prepared to do a lot of fake yawning to see if it's true that dogs can"catch" yawns from their owners.
Yawning in dogs used to be considered a sign of anxiety.
And she is just the latest in a line of journalists who have fallen foul of the Beeb's new open-plan newsroom, with colleagues spotted yawning, stretching and mucking about.