yellow

(redirected from yellower)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to yellower: yellowest
See: recreant
References in classic literature ?
The largest (of fixed stars) is spangled, and the seventh (or sun) is brightest; the eighth (or moon) coloured by the reflected light of the seventh; the second and fifth (Saturn and Mercury) are in colour like one another, and yellower than the preceding; the third (Venus) has the whitest light; the fourth (Mars) is reddish; the sixth (Jupiter) is in whiteness second.
O Zarathustra," said they, "it is consequently FOR THAT REASON that thou thyself always becometh yellower and darker, although thy hair looketh white and flaxen?
Heron says south-facing windows tend to offer a yellower light.
The cabbage will gradually lose water and become softer, yellower and more sour.
Breast meat color of 3 breeds of Korean local chicken was significantly lighter (CIE L*), redder (CIE a*), and yellower (CIE b*) than that of silky fowl (p<0.
It can be seen that UV exposure resulted in a change of color for all the samples: PHB and the blends whitened probably due to a change of surface roughness and crystallinity (17) whereas PP became yellower due to the formation of chromophores that can absorb visible light.
Let his skin grow yellower and let his eyes become unseeing; let the hunch on his back grow to the size of a mountain that crushes him; let the doctors and nurses continue to pour nourishment down the feeding tube to deny him the peace that he believes will be offered by the grave.
Since 2007, she has also been experimenting with a yellower tone, with the white engobe underneath, to suggest a soft dusting of pollen.
With a higher resolution spectrograph, he might be able to detect comets around the older and yellower G and F stars around which most exoplanets have been found.
10) In this disparaged aesthetics of the familiar, however, the larger, brighter, yellower melon-flower ceases to be luminous in comparison with the common, small, less yellowy, and yet unavailable English buttercup.